No Room at the Inn: Mass Migration Threatens Sweden’s Tourism Sector

H/t reader kevin a.

“Sweden’s tourism industry campsites and other accommodations that are important to the industry will be fully occupied by asylum seekers, with the high season approaching.”


From March 29, 2016:

No Room at the Inn: Mass Migration Threatens Sweden’s Tourism Sector:

Sweden’s tourism industry has been threatened by the massive upswing in immigration, argues the Swedish newspaper Svenska Dagbladet, which explains that many hotels, campsites and other accommodations that are important to the industry will be fully occupied by asylum seekers, with the high season approaching.

The Swedish tourism sector has a yearly turnover of nearly 270 billion SEK (roughly 32 billion USD) and employs nearly 160,000 people, according to data from the Swedish Growth Board (Tillväxtverket). In addition to spending money on transport and accommodation, tourists visit restaurants, shops and entertain themselves, spending an additional 100 billion SEK (roughly 12 billion USD), according to a report presented last summer. Above all, the inflow of foreign tourists has increased sharply in recent years. Between 2000 and 2014, the foreign visitors’ total spending rose by a staggering 137 percent, making tourism an important source of revenue for Swedish companies, municipalities and the state.

Read moreNo Room at the Inn: Mass Migration Threatens Sweden’s Tourism Sector

Mount Rubbish: Tourist Landfill Threatening Bali’s Paradise (Video)


Aug 26, 2014

More than 10 million people visit Bali each year, almost three times its local population. It is a huge stress on its resources, but with tourism so important to its economy, how can the competing demands be met?

Many thousands of cubic metres of waste are dumped everyday in Bali. A new local site not to be found on the tourist trail is Mount Rubbish. Worse still, the toxic run-off from this mountain of waste filters into Bali’s source of drinking water. “We are being poisoned by this pile of rubbish”, says environmental activist Moko. But garbage is not the only problem; Bali’s development is based on foreign exploitation, which has made locals feel that their very way of life is under threat. Many Balinese now believe that keeping culture and traditions strong could be their last defence. “We Balinese should take the move to save Bali, before it’s too late”, a local campaigner explains.

Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe Asked To Be UN’s New International Envoy For Tourism

The Zimbabwe president, accused of ethnic cleansing and bankrupting his country, asked to champion tourism


Zimbabwean president Robert Mugabe has been asked by the UN to champion tourism. Photograph: Aaron Ufumeli/EPA/Corbis

Robert Mugabe asked to be UN ‘leader for tourism’ (Guardian, May 29, 2012):

With a line-up that includes Drew Barrymore, David Beckham, Orlando Bloom, and Ricky Martin, the UN’s choice of ambassadors has been known to cause raised eyebrows or the odd smirk.

Seldom, however, has there been such anger, or questioning of the organisation’s credibility, as that greeting the appointment of a new international envoy for tourism: Robert Mugabe.

Improbable as it seems, the Zimbabwean president, who is widely accused of ethnic cleansing, rigging elections, terrorising opposition, controlling media and presiding over a collapsed economy, has been endorsed as a champion of efforts to boost global holidaymaking.

Despite that fact Mugabe, 88, is under a travel ban, he has been honoured as a “leader for tourism” by the UN’s World Tourism Organisation, along with his political ally, Zambian president Michael Sata, 75. The pair signed an agreement with UNWTO secretary general Taleb Rifai at their shared border at Victoria Falls on Tuesday.

Read moreZimbabwe President Robert Mugabe Asked To Be UN’s New International Envoy For Tourism

Germans Just Say No To Greek Tourism, As Holiday Bookings Plunge By 30 Percent

Germans Just Say No To Greek Tourism, As Holiday Bookings Plunge By 30% (ZeroHedge, May 21, 2012):

The last time we looked at the Greek tourism industry or what’s left of it, ironically so very reliant on German tourists, we observed that receipts from this very critical to Greek tax receipts industry would likely drop to under €10 billion – a big hit to government revenues just when they are most needed. Needless to say, ongoing political chaos, a rise in anti-German sentiment, and a resurgent neo-nazi political power are not helping things. Sure enough Ekathimerini reports that German bookings continue to be in free fall: “German bookings for holidays in Greece have slumped by almost a third so far this year, a German Sunday paper quoted a Thomas Cook executive as saying. “By the beginning of the Summer season, booking numbers for holiday in Greece in the German travel industry have been 30 percent below the year-earlier figures,” Euro am Sonntag cited the head of tourism at Thomas Cook’s German unit, Michael Tenzer as saying in an excerpt of an article made available to Reuters on Saturday.”

Read moreGermans Just Say No To Greek Tourism, As Holiday Bookings Plunge By 30 Percent

‘Now Is The Season For Japan’ (New York Times)

WTF!


Now Is the Season for Japan (New York Times, March 22, 2012):

ONE bright early spring morning this month, I took myself to Ryoanji, the Kyoto temple that is home to the world’s most celebrated rock garden. There was not a single other foreigner in the place. Not even many Japanese were visible across the 120-acre compound (I’d scheduled my trip for spring break, when clamorous school tours are less in evidence).

So as I sat above the enigmatic presentation of 15 rocks, arranged with seeming randomness across a wide bed of raked sand, I could hear nothing but bird song from the cherry trees around me. A trickle of water from a thin bamboo chute issued into a stone basin around the corner, deepening as it intensified the silence. The characters around the basin said, “What you have is all you need.”

Stillness, spaciousness and undistractedness are what I had just then. Though foreign tourism to Japan as a whole plunged by 50 percent in the three months following the earthquake last March, as of January 2012 it was only 4 percent lower, according to the Japan National Tourism Organization.

Nevertheless, the quiet amplitude that is one of the special graces of Japan has a new resonance this year. On the surface, the country that greets someone arriving from San Francisco or New York tomorrow is startlingly similar to the place you would have seen two years ago, despite last year’s catastrophe. But deep down, Japan seems more vulnerable, and thus more wide open, than ever.

The 9.0 earthquake, tsunami and nuclear meltdown that hit the country on March 11, 2011, claimed almost 20,000 lives, overturned an economy that had already been foundering through 20 years of recession, and demoralized a citizenry dealing with one suicide every 17 minutes, a loss of direction, and what is now seven prime ministers in fewer than six years.

Yet it also highlighted the resilience, self-possession and community-mindedness that are so striking in Japan; suddenly, the country that had seemed to insist on its difference from the rest of the world could be seen in its more human, compassionate and brave dimensions. Japan has long been what the globally savvy magazine Monocle called, in a recent issue, “The World’s Most Charming Nation”; now it is also one of those most grateful for visitors.

Read more‘Now Is The Season For Japan’ (New York Times)

2,400,000 Less Tourists Visited Japan in 2011 Compared To 2010

See also:

Prof. Dr. Chris Busby: ‘You Shouldn’t Go On A Business Trip To Japan’ – ‘Get Out Of Japan’ – ‘Run!’ – ‘I Would Get Out Of Tokyo’ (Video)


Foreign tourist decreased by 2,400,000 in 2011 (Fukushima Diary, Jan. 20, 2012):

Foreign tourist to Japan decreased by 2,400,000 (-27.8%) in 2011.

2010 : 8,610,000
2011 : 6,219,300

Read more2,400,000 Less Tourists Visited Japan in 2011 Compared To 2010

Tokyo Metropolitan Government To Subsidize Fukushima Tourism Tours Starting On April Fool’s Day

From the article:

Or as Professor Hayakawa of Gunma University often comments, “If you don’t educate yourself now and fast, you’ll die.”


Tokyo Metropolitan Government to Subsidize Tours to Fukushima Only Next Year (EX-SKF,Jan. 10, 2012):

Did you even know that the Tokyo Metropolitan government had such a program?

Not satisfied enough by accepting and burning disaster debris of varying radiation levels from Iwate and Miyagi Prefecture (in case of the Miyagi debris, it is to be burned all over Tokyo) and collecting fat fees for “facilitating” the effort, the Tokyo Metropolitan government will now focus on the tourism industry in Fukushima Prefecture. It will subsidize tourists who will visit Fukushima, starting the next fiscal year which will start on April Fool’s Day.

From Yomiuri Shinbun (1/11/2011):

東京都は来年度、福島県に日帰り旅行する観光客について、1人1500円を、宿泊客には2泊まで1泊3000円を助成することを決めた。

The Tokyo Metropolitan government has decided to subsidize tourists who will visit Fukushima Prefecture starting the next fiscal year [that will start on April 1]. Tourists who visit on a day trip will be given 1,500 yen [about US$20], and tourists who stay overnight will be given 3,000 yen [about US$40] per night up to two nights.

Read moreTokyo Metropolitan Government To Subsidize Fukushima Tourism Tours Starting On April Fool’s Day

The Fukushima ‘Cold Shutdown’ Effect (1): ‘Let’s All Visit Fukushima’ Japanese Government Campaign

Everyone that has studied the links provided below would have fled Fukushima, even Tokyo.


#Fukushima I Nuke Plant “Cold Shutdown” Effect: “Let’s All Visit Fukushima” Campaign by the National Government (EX-SKF, Dec. 19, 2011):

It looks as if a total, complete cold shutdown has been achieved in the heads of some ministers and agency heads and career bureaucrats in the Japanese national government.

The Japan Tourism Agency under the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism launched a new campaign on the day of the declaration of the “cold shutdown/accident over” by Prime Minister Yoshikiko “Saved by Kim” Noda.

What’s the campaign, you ask?

“Let’s go visit Fukushima Prefecture, now that the Step 2 of the TEPCO/government Roadmap has been completed!” Rejoice, it’s safe!

From the Japan Tourism Agency press release (12/16/2011):

Read moreThe Fukushima ‘Cold Shutdown’ Effect (1): ‘Let’s All Visit Fukushima’ Japanese Government Campaign