The Tesla Model 3 Will Need to Improve Its Charge Time, Fast

The Tesla Model 3 Will Need to Improve Its Charge Time, Fast:

Tesla wants the upcoming Model 3 to be the first electric car for everyone, but to do so, it’ll need a seriously amount of infrastructure in place. Fast charging is critical to the electric car’s success — drivers need to be able to top up the car’s juice in an emergency — but Tesla’s network of fast chargers might not be adequate for the company’s production targets.

We don’t know for sure how long the Model 3 will take to charge, but we can reach an approximation based on Tesla’s current range. The 90kWh Model S, with a range of 294 miles as tested by the EPA, takes around 10 hours to charge from a NEMA 14-50 power outlet. From a wall connector, that can drop to as low as five hours and 30 minutes.

Read moreThe Tesla Model 3 Will Need to Improve Its Charge Time, Fast

Wind farms would need to ‘cover whole of Scotland’ to power Britain’s electric vehicles

Wind farms would need to ‘cover whole of Scotland’ to power Britain’s electric vehicles:

SCOTLAND would need to be entirely covered by wind farms in order to power all of Britain’s electric cars, according to a leading academic.

Jack Ponton, emeritus professor of engineering at Edinburgh University, said another 16,000 turbines would be required in order to replace petrol and diesel cars with electric vehicles.

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has pledged to phase out the internal combustion engine by 2032 – eight years ahead of the rest of the UK.

But Prof Ponton said that, even if the issues of power generation and charging points were sorted out, the National Grid could simply not cope with the increased demand.

He said: “It is a nice idea as electric cars are much more efficient, cleaner and actually simpler devices than the current internal combustion engine vehicles.

“Technically, it is an excellent idea. But the problem starts when you begin to think, ‘Where are you going to get the energy to run them?’.

H/t reader kevin a.

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Quant Electric Car Powered By Salt Water: 920 Horsepower, Up To 600 Km Driving Range, 0-100 Km/h In 2.8 Seconds, Top Speed Of 350 Km/h

And sadly …

“The supercar that runs using ‘saltwater’ is likely BS.”

Read Lana Verdin’s comment down below.


salt-powered-qaunt-quant-e-sportlimousine-electric-salt-water-car

Electric Car Powered by Salt Water: 920 hp, 373 Miles/Tank (Aetherforce):

It’s finally here folks and it is LEGIT.

Tesla eat your heart out, the Germans have created an electrical car powered by salt water. It has four electric engines and is FAST with some pretty sweet fuel economy for a sports car. Leave the Bugatti at home and stop by the beach to refuel.

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01-Salt-Water-Car

The recent announcement that the Quant e-Sportlimousine, which is a salt water powered car, has been certified for use on European roads is a big sign that the Oil Cartels are losing the energy war.

Since the early 1900s, the Oil Cartels, which are controlled by the Controllers, have been harassing and silencing alternative energy inventors who pose a threat to the Oil Cartels. One of the greatest alternative energy inventors that they silenced was Nikola Tesla.

Unlike traditional cars that run on gasoline, the Quant e-Sportlimousine runs on an electrolyte flow cell power system made by NanoFlowcell that has the ability to generate an astonishing 920 horsepower (680 kW).

This salt water powered car can go from 0-62 mph (100 km/h) in 2.8 seconds and has a top speed of 217.5 mph (350 km/h). The Quant e-Sportlimousine is built by the German company Quant.

Read moreQuant Electric Car Powered By Salt Water: 920 Horsepower, Up To 600 Km Driving Range, 0-100 Km/h In 2.8 Seconds, Top Speed Of 350 Km/h

Forget Tesla ‘D’ – This Is The Fastest Electric Car In The World

The Fastest Electric Car In The World

Forget Tesla ‘D’ – This Is The Fastest Electric Car In The World (OilPrice, Nov 6, 2014):

When we think of electric cars, probably the first thing that comes to mind is the Chevrolet Volt, which is smooth running but needs frequent recharging. Plus it’s no speed demon.

But if you think electric cars still deserve consideration, take a look at the “Grimsel,” the creation of the technical schools ETH Zurich and Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts. On Nov. 3 the students put the spurs to the car and got it to accelerate from 0 to 100 kilometers per hour (62 mph) in 1.785 seconds, using less than 30 meters of track.

That’s nearly twice as fast as Tesla’s fleet Model S P85D. And it’s record-breaking.

Read moreForget Tesla ‘D’ – This Is The Fastest Electric Car In The World

The Very First Porsche (1898) Was An Electric Car And Sat Untouched In A Warehouse For 111 Years

The Very First Porsche (1898) Was An Electric Car And Sat Untouched In A Warehouse For 111 Years
It looks steampunk, but it’s really an electric vehicle.(Credit: Porsche)

Porsche’s 1898 e-car returns after a century in storage (CNET, Jan 28, 2014):

The very first Porsche, an electric carriage, sat untouched in a warehouse for 111 years, but now it’s come home.

On June 26, 1898, Ferdinand Porsche’s “Egger-Lohner C.2 electric vehicle,” better known as the “P-1,” rolled on to the streets of Vienna for the first time. In 1899, the P-1 took the gold medal (by a full 18 minutes!) against a field of other electric vehicles in Berlin. Then in 1902, as Porsche put the first all-wheel drive passenger car into production, the P-1 was parked in a warehouse…where it sat untouched for the next 111 years.

After missing two world wars, the entire Berlin Wall era, and six “Fast and Furious” flicks during the intervening 11 decades, Porsche says in a release (PDF) the P-1 has now been recovered and is on permanent display, unrestored, at the Porsche Museum in Stuttgart, Germany.

Read moreThe Very First Porsche (1898) Was An Electric Car And Sat Untouched In A Warehouse For 111 Years

Henry Paulson Burned As Another Electric Car Maker Goes Up In Flames

Hank Paulson Burned As Another Electric Car Maker Goes Up In Flames (ZeroHedge, Mai 1, 2013):

It would appear that (apart from Tesla, for now) that any thing related to electric cars is going up in flames. From Fisker’s fubar (and blowing all that hard-earned government funding) and Chevy’s Volt dysphoria to A-123 Systems (the Lithium-Ion battery-maker) and now Coda – which Yahoo Finance notes was among an emerging crop of California startups seeking to build emission-free electric cars three years ago. After selling just 100 of its $37,250 five-passenger vehicles, Coda filed Chapter 11 today taking a few well-known investors with it. On the bright side, the government was not involved (from what we can tell), but on the even brighter side, none other than former US Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson was among those burned by the company going up in flames (as was Harbinger’s Phil Falcone).Despite the $300 million the company managed to raise, that quickly went and unable to raise an additional $150 million in new funding (we suspect blaming ‘market conditions’ for its mere $22million raise), Coda had no choice (and Fortress was more than happy to scoop it up and provide the DIP – the cars will make for fancy paperweights in a collateral liquidation). ‘Green’ is the new ‘red’ as it seems when it comes to electric cars, regardless of funding source – private or public – it goes up in flames.

Via Reuters,

Green car startup Coda Holdings Inc filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on Wednesday after selling just 100 of its all-electric sedans, another example of battery-powered vehicles’ failure to break into the mass market.

… exit the auto sector and refocus on energy storage, a far less capital-intensive business.

Read moreHenry Paulson Burned As Another Electric Car Maker Goes Up In Flames

115-Year-Old Electric Car Gets Same 40 Miles To The Charge As Highly Praised Chevy Volt

From the article:

As the New York Times reported September 5, “For General Motors and the Obama administration, the new Chevrolet Volt plug-in hybrid represents the automotive future, the culmination of decades of high-tech research financed partly with federal dollars.”

Flashback (A MUST-SEE!!!):

Who Killed The Electric Car? (Documentary)

Man Builds Electric Car for $4750, Costs $7 For Every 300 Miles (Video)

Related info:

Electric Vehicle Called ‘Schluckspecht’ (‘Boozer’) Sets New 1,013.8 Miles Record On Single Battery Charge

Green Car Made From Hemp And Powered By An Electric Motor

EU Rules: Silent Electric Cars Must Make Noise!

New Nanoscale Material Developed For Electric Cars

Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu Throws $1.4 Billion Loan To Nissan Leaf

World’s first electric car built by Victorian inventor in 1884

… and General Motors CEO Dan Akerson called the Chevy Volt “not a step forward, but a leap forward” ???

Just more BS they want us to believe in!


115-year-old electric car gets same 40 miles to the charge as Chevy Volt (Daily Caller, Oct. 14, 2011):

Meet the Roberts electric car. Built in 1896, it gets a solid 40 miles to the charge — exactly the mileage Chevrolet advertises for the Volt, the highly touted $31,645 electric car General Motors CEO Dan Akerson called “not a step forward, but a leap forward.”

The executives at Chevrolet can rest easy for now. Since the Roberts was constructed in an age before Henry Ford’s mass production, the 115-year-old electric car is one of a kind.

But don’t let the car’s advanced age let you think it isn’t tough: Its present-day owner, who prefers not to be named, told The Daily Caller it still runs like a charm, and has even completed the roughly 60-mile London to Brighton Vintage Car Race.

If you didn’t know there are electric cars as old as the Roberts, you aren’t alone. Prior to today’s electric v. gas skirmishes, there was another battle: electric v. gas v. steam. This contest was fought in the market place, and history shows gas gave electric and steam an even more thorough whooping than Coca-Cola gave Moxie.

But while the Roberts electric car clearly lacked GPS, power steering and, yes, air bags, the distance it could achieve on a charge, when compared with its modern equivalent, provides a telling example of the slow pace of the electric car.

Driven by a tiller instead of a wheel, the Roberts car was built seven years before the Wright brothers’ first flight, 12 years before the Ford Model T, 16 years before Chevrolet was founded and 114 years before the first Chevy Volt was delivered to a customer.

As the New York Times reported September 5, “For General Motors and the Obama administration, the new Chevrolet Volt plug-in hybrid represents the automotive future, the culmination of decades of high-tech research financed partly with federal dollars.”

Read more115-Year-Old Electric Car Gets Same 40 Miles To The Charge As Highly Praised Chevy Volt

Electric Vehicle Called ‘Schluckspecht’ (‘Boozer’) Sets New 1,013.8 Miles Record On Single Battery Charge

‘Boozer’ EV sets 1,000 miles-plus record on single charge (PhysOrg, August 17, 2011):

An experimental electric vehicle called “Schluckspecht” (“boozer,” or “tippler” in German) has set the record for achieving the longest drive in a battery-powered vehicle on a single battery charge. Its record-breaking distance was 1,013.8 miles (1,631.5 km). The trip lasted 36 hours and 12 minutes. The Schluckspecht E, as the winning machine is called, was developed at Germany’s University of Applied Sciences, Offenburg, in collaboration with other academic groups. The test drive took place in Boxberg at the Bosch corporate test track, where a team of four drivers made the trip, as they took turns navigating over the long stretch of hours.

While nothing beats a world record, this is not the first time Team Schluckspecht has made the EV design scene sit up and take notice. They also won attention at the South African Solar Challenge last year, driving 389 miles on a single charge.

Read moreElectric Vehicle Called ‘Schluckspecht’ (‘Boozer’) Sets New 1,013.8 Miles Record On Single Battery Charge