Study: Massive Volcano ‘Wiped Out The Neanderthals 40,000 Years Ago’

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Neanderthal man may have been wiped out 40,000 years ago after a volcanic eruption

European Neanderthals may have been wiped out by a catastrophic volcanic eruption over 40,000 years ago, according to new research.

A new study says that a massive explosion caused the onset of a ‘volcanic winter’ that devastated their population.

Researchers led by Liubov Golovanova of Russia’s ANO Laboratory of Prehistory in St. Petersburg report that volcanic dust deposits found in a cave in the Caucasus show that an ecological disaster was responsible.

Very few plants existed in the volcanic dust layers, the researchers discovered.

The loss of plants would have affected the population of large mammals, which were the Neanderthals’ main source of food.

The Neanderthals were replaced about 30,000 years ago by modern-day humans.

Read moreStudy: Massive Volcano ‘Wiped Out The Neanderthals 40,000 Years Ago’

Indonesia: Sumatra Volcano Erupts For The First Time In Four Centuries

Volcano erupts in Indonesia forcing thousands from homes

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Villagers watch as a plume of smoke emerges from Mount Sinabung. Photograph: Tarmizy Harva/Reyters

(Reuters) — A volcano has erupted on the Indonesian island of Sumatra for the first time in four centuries, sending smoke 1,500 metres into the air and prompting the evacation of thousands of residents.

There are no reports of casualties so far, and aviation in the area is unaffected.

Mount Sinabung, in the north of Sumatra, began erupting around midnight after rumbling for several days. Lava was overflowing from its crater, the head of Indonesia’s vulcanology centre told Reuters news agency. The agency has placed the volcano on red alert, its highest level.

Read moreIndonesia: Sumatra Volcano Erupts For The First Time In Four Centuries

Second Much Larger Iceland Volcano ‘Close To Failure,’ Say Scientists

2nd Iceland volcano issues warning

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Katla Volcano covered by the glacier Myrdalsjokull (Photo: Dave McGarvie)

LONDON – A second, much larger volcano in Iceland is showing signs that it may be about to erupt, scientists have warned.

Since the start of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption, which caused cancellations of thousands of flights in Europe because of a giant ash cloud, there has been much speculation about neighboring Katla.

An initial research paper by the University College of London Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction said: “Analysis of the seismic energy released around Katla over the last decade or so is interpreted as providing evidence of a rising … intrusive magma body on the western flank of the volcano.”

“Earlier seismic energy release at Katla is associated with the inflation of the volcano, which indicates it is close to failure, although this does not appear to be linked to seismicity around Eyjafjallajökull,” it added.

Read moreSecond Much Larger Iceland Volcano ‘Close To Failure,’ Say Scientists

Hekla Volcano Activity Being Monitored Closely, Though Rumors Of Second Iceland Eruption Are False

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The Hekla volcano is Iceland’s most active volcano and a new Hekla eruption is feared.

The Hekla volcano has had more than 20 major eruptions since the 9th century, and Hekla has had eruptions in 1980, 1991 and 2000.

Many believe that the next Hekla eruption is imminent, and the recent Iceland volcano eruption in Eyjafjallajoekull has added to those fears.

But rumors of a Hekla volcano eruption today are false.

Twitter was filled with Hekla eruption rumors after an MSNBC Twitter feed @BreakingNews tweeted, “Large plume indicates second Icelandic volcano, Hekla, has begun erupting – watch live http://bit.ly/9iNfKE.”

That tweet was retweeted more than 600 times, though the feed later corrected itself.

The BNO News Wire Service also reported the eruption, stating, “REYKJAVIK (BNO NEWS) — The Hekla volcano in southern Iceland has erupted.”

Read moreHekla Volcano Activity Being Monitored Closely, Though Rumors Of Second Iceland Eruption Are False

Iceland Volcano: An Eyeful of Eyjafjallajökull – There May Be Worse to Come

Flying over Eyjafjallajökull, the Icelandic volcano that’s brought Europe’s air travel to a halt, is not for the fainthearted. And there may be worse to come.

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Fresh eruptions thrust new torrents of molten rock through the shattered ice sheets in the mountain crater, spewing a towering wall of ash, dust and steam high into the air. Photo: SIGURSTEINN BALDURSSON

The power and wrath of Eyjafjallajökull came into dramatic clarity this weekend as the clouds parted for the first time since the glacier-topped volcano threw world air travel into turmoil.

Fresh eruptions thrust new torrents of molten rock through the shattered ice sheets in the mountain crater, spewing a towering wall of ash, dust and steam high into the air.

I was aboard a small six-seater helicopter carrying the first civilian passengers to approach the scene when coastguard observers operating aircraft high above warned the pilot to be wary of the latest barrage of explosions.

Read moreIceland Volcano: An Eyeful of Eyjafjallajökull – There May Be Worse to Come

Iceland Volcano Eruption Causes Europe Travel Chaos

Footage released of erupting Icelandic volcano (ITN)


A Cloud of Volcanic Ash Has Led To Airpace Closures All Over Europe

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Smoke and steam is seen rising from the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, which erupted for the second time in less than a month. The eruption melted ice, shot smoke and steam into the air and forced hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. (AP)

Airports across Europe were thrown into chaos today after ash drifting from Iceland’s erupting volcano caused several countries to close their airspace.

The potentially dangerous cloud of ash and rock spewed up by the volcano more than 1,000 miles away caused the U.K., Norway, Ireland and Sweden to enforce a nationwide no fly policy, stranding thousands of travelers .

France has also announced some airport closures, and Holland, Belgium, Denmark and Germany are expected to follow suit.

“So we’re talking about almost one quarter of the entire European area is closed to aircraft at the moment.” Brian Flyn of EuroControl, a European aviation authority, told reporters.

It is not yet clear when the flying restrictions will be lifted, but the Eyjafjallajokull volcano is still erupting and could continue spewing ash into the atmosphere for weeks.

“It is likely that the production of ash will continue at a comparable level for some days or weeks,” said Einar Kjartansson, a geophysicist at the Icelandic Meteorological Office. “But where it disrupts travel, that depends on the weather.”

Read moreIceland Volcano Eruption Causes Europe Travel Chaos

Europe’s largest undersea volcano threatens southern Italy: report

ROME (AFP) – Europe’s largest undersea volcano could disintegrate and unleash a tsunami that would engulf southern Italy “at any time”, a prominent vulcanologist warned in an interview published Monday.

The Marsili volcano, which is bursting with magma, has “fragile walls” that could collapse, Enzo Boschi told the leading daily Corriere della Sera.

“It could even happen tomorrow,” said Boschi, president of the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology (INGV).

“Our latest research shows that the volcano is not structurally solid, its walls are fragile, the magma chamber is of sizeable dimensions,” he said. “All that tells us that the volcano is active and could begin erupting at any time.”

The event would result in “a strong tsunami that could strike the coasts of Campania, Calabria and Sicily,” Boschi said.

The undersea Marsili, 3,000 meters (9,800 feet) tall and located some 150 kilometres (90 miles) southwest of Naples, has not erupted since the start of recorded history.

It is 70 kilometres long and 30 kilometres wide, and its crater is some 450 metres below the surface of the Tyrrhenian Sea.

Read moreEurope’s largest undersea volcano threatens southern Italy: report

Totally Mad Scientists: Simulated Volcanic Eruptions to Block Sun

1. Those idiots should study nature, doing their best to understand it and not experiment with it.

2. There is no such thing as man-made global warming and global warming in general is a total scam.

Godfrey Bloom Exposes the Global Warming Scam (European Parliament, Strasbourg, 20.01.2010)

(More information below the following article.)


A geoengineering project to block the sun by simulating volcanic eruptions would be 100 times cheaper than cutting greenhouse gas emissions, climate change scientists said.

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One proposal is for a fleet of ships that would spray seawater into the sky that would leave behind salt crystals to brighten clouds Photo: NASA

A global plan to put man-made particles into the atmosphere to deflect the Sun’s heat would rapidly lower global temperatures until cuts in carbon dioxide emissions took effect, they argued.

They acknowledged concerns about geoengineering but said multi-national experiments should begin soon before it is too late to reverse climate change or in case a rogue state carried out separate measures.

The environmental scientists, David Keith of the University of Calgary in Canada, Edward Parson of the University of Michigan and Granger Morgan of Carnegie Mellon University, were writing an editorial in the journal, Nature.

They called for governments to establish a multimillion-pound fund for research into the simulated volcanoes and other solar-radiation management techniques for shielding the Earth against sunlight.

“The idea of deliberately manipulating Earth’s energy balance to offset human-driven climate change strikes many as dangerous hubris,” they wrote.

Read moreTotally Mad Scientists: Simulated Volcanic Eruptions to Block Sun

Alaska volcano Mount Redoubt erupts 3 times

Alaska’s Mount Redoubt volcano has begun erupting over night, sending smoke billowing some 50,000 feet above sea level.


Alaska’s Mount Redoubt volcano has begun erupting over night, sending smoke billowing some 50,000 feet above sea level. Photo: EPA

Geologists at the Alaska Volcano Observatory said the volcano, which is roughly 100 miles from southwest of Anchorage, erupted three times late on Sunday and early on Monday.

“This is a fairly large eruption, close to the larger cities in Alaska,” said John Power, a geophysicist.

More information: Q & A: Will Mount Redoubt erupt again? (MSNBC)

He said no cities have yet reported any ash fall from the volcano, but he added that it is still early.

Geologists said seismic activity around the volcano has been intense in recent days, and they expect that the volcano would blow soon.

Read moreAlaska volcano Mount Redoubt erupts 3 times

Japan taps into power of volcanoes with geothermal energy plants

Japan has announced plans to build its first new geothermal power stations in nearly two decades in a bid to tap the nation’s domestic energy sources.

A string of geothermal power plants are to be developed by a number of firms keen to capitalise on the active volcanic landscape that spans the country, while the government is also currently compiling guidelines supporting the development of such energy sources.

Home to 108 active volcanoes – ten per cent of the world’s active volcanoes – Japan is in a prime position to tap into underground geothermal energy sources.

As a nation with few natural resources, Japan has long been dependent on importing substantial quantities of crude oil and natural gas. The country’s renewed focus on geothermal energy marks a desired shift away from its dependency on imported energy sources which has made it susceptible to increasingly volatile prices.

Read moreJapan taps into power of volcanoes with geothermal energy plants