Siberia Heat: Did The Arctic Region Break A Heat Record?

Siberia Heat: Did The Arctic Region Break A Heat Record? (Huffington Post, July 26, 2013):

Did the Arctic region break a heat record?

According to English-language outlet The Siberian Times, temperatures of 32 degrees Celsius, or 89.6 degrees Fahrenheit, were recorded in the Siberian city of Norilsk on July 21. The average temperature in July in the region is 13.6 C, or 56.48 F.

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‘Russian Winter Goes EXTREME’ (Pravda): -50 Degrees Celsius In Siberia …. Video: ‘USDA Says NEW WARM LATITUDES Shift North = Russia/Sibera North Pole’

Russian winter goes extreme, claims lives (Pravda, Feb. 1, 2012):

Winter temperatures in Russia have gone extreme. The air in some regions of the republic of Yakutia (Siberia) has cooled down to -50 degrees Centigrade. Anomalous cold of -40 degrees is expected in the Perm region of Russia, Vesti.Ru reports.

In the European part of Russia, the current temperatures are ten degrees below the norm. On Wednesday morning, the temperature in the Moscow region dropped to 26 and even 30 degrees below zero Centigrade.

Cold weather is expected to become even colder this week in Moscow and the region, RIA Novosti reports. Winter cold has already claimed several human lives. One person died of frostbite yesterday in Moscow. Ten others asked for medical help and were hospitalized.

Read more‘Russian Winter Goes EXTREME’ (Pravda): -50 Degrees Celsius In Siberia …. Video: ‘USDA Says NEW WARM LATITUDES Shift North = Russia/Sibera North Pole’

Unbelievable Record Cold From Siberia To Alaska

Unbelievable Record Cold (WOODTV8, Nov. 18, 2011):

Even at Noon, the sun hangs on the edge of the horizon at this time of year in the frigid tundra of northern Alaska.  The cold that extends from Siberia to Alaska is extraordinary.  Thursday’s high temperature of -30F at Fairbanks, Alaska was 39 degrees colder than average!!  Wow!  Many record low temperatures were set in Alaska.  Here’s a list.  The coldest spot I could find was Manley Hot Springs at 54 below zero!  North Pole, Alaska dipped to -49,  Fort Yukon sank to -46 and Eielson AFB bottomed out at -43.  An Air Quality Warning was issued for Fairbanks, where the cold air settles near the ground and doesn’t mix out during the short day.  Oymyakon, Siberia has had three consecutive mornings of -50 or colder.  The last day they had that was warmer than average was October 11th.  Here’s a cool time lapse from the Intl. Space Station…nice pictures of auroras and lightning.

The 10 Most Radioactive Places on Earth

10 Most Radioactive Places on Earth (brainz):

While the 2011 earthquake and worries surrounding Fukushima have brought the threat of radioactivity back into the public consciousness, many people still don’t realize that radioactive contamination is a worldwide danger. Radionuclides are in the top six toxic threats as listed in the 2010 report by The Blacksmith Institute, an NGO dedicated to tackling pollution. You might be surprised by the locations of some of the world’s most radioactive places — and thus the number of people living in fear of the effects radiation could have on them and their children.

10. Hanford, USA

The Hanford Site, in Washington, was an integral part of the US atomic bomb project, manufacturing plutonium for the first nuclear bomb and “Fat Man,” used at Nagasaki. As the Cold War waged on, it ramped up production, supplying plutonium for most of America’s 60,000 nuclear weapons. Although decommissioned, it still holds two thirds of the volume of the country’s high-level radioactive waste — about 53 million gallons of liquid waste, 25 million cubic feet of solid waste and 200 square miles of contaminated groundwater underneath the area, making it the most contaminated site in the US. The environmental devastation of this area makes it clear that the threat of radioactivity is not simply something that will arrive in a missile attack, but could be lurking in the heart of your own country.

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France’s CEREA Simulation Map Shows US More Contaminated Than Western Japan

Map of Cesium-137 Deposition Across the Pacific by CEREA Shows the US More Contaminated Than Western Japan (EX-SKF, August 31, 2011):

France’s CEREA has the simulation map of ground deposition of cesium-137 from the Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant accident on its “Fukushima” page. It not only shows Japan but also the entire northern Pacific Rim, from Russian Siberia to Alaska to the West Coast of the US to the entire US.

According to the map, the US, particularly the West Coast and particularly California, may be more contaminated with radioactive cesium than the western half of Japan or Hokkaido. It looks more contaminated than South Korea or China. Canada doesn’t look too well either, particularly along the border with US on the western half.

From CEREA’s Fukushima page:

Atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides from the Fukushima-Daichii nuclear power plant

CEREA, joint laboratory École des Ponts ParisTech and EdF R&D
Victor Winiarek, Marc Bocquet, Yelva Roustan, Camille Birman, Pierre Tran

Map of ground deposition of caesium-137 for the Fukushima-Daichii accident.

The simulation was performed with a specific version of the numerical atmospheric chemistry and transport model Polyphemus/Polair3D. The parametrisations used for the transport and physical removal of the radionuclides are described in [1,2,3,4].

The magnitude of the deposition field is uncertain and the simulated values of deposited radionuclides could be significantly different from the actual deposition. In particular, the source term remains uncertain. Therefore, these results should be seen as preliminary and they are likely to be revised as new information become available to better constrain the source term and when radionuclides data can be used to evaluate the model simulation results.

The page also has the animated simulation of cesium-137 dispersion from March 11 to April 6, 2011. If the Japanese think they are the only ones who have the radiation and radioactive fallout from the accident, they are very much mistaken, if the simulation is accurate. (Meteorological institutes and bureaus in Austria, Germany, and Norway all had similar simulation maps.)

Read moreFrance’s CEREA Simulation Map Shows US More Contaminated Than Western Japan

Russia: Lost Gold Of Tsars Found In Lake Baikal, The World’s Deepest Lake

russia_lost-gold-of-tsars-found-in-lake-baikal
Kolchak’s gold in a Russian bank Kazan in 1918 before being moved onto the Lake Baikal train

A RUSSIAN mini-submarine may have found billions of pounds worth of lost gold in a Siberian lake, it was revealed yesterday.

Explorers have long searched for lost Tsarist treasures dating from the Bolshevik Revolution, when forces loyal to the deposed royal family fled the advancing Red Army.

Legend has it that 1,600 tons of gold – which could now be worth billions of pounds – was lost when anti-Communist commander Admiral Alexander Kolchak’s train plunged into Lake Baikal, the world’s oldest and deepest freshwater lake.

Last year, parts of a train and ammunition boxes were found.

And in recent days, the Mir-2 submersible has discovered “shiny metal objects” 1,200 feet below the surface at Cape Tolstoy. “Deep-sea vehicles found rectangular blocks with a metallic gleam, like gold,” said one source.

Explorers attempted to grab hold of the blocks with a manipulator arm but failed because of loose gravel on the bottom of the lake. Sources say that the submariners know the exact spot and are planning a new mission to determine if they have found the gold.

The Moscow News independent newspaper yesterday ran a story on the find, with the headline: “Lost gold of the Whites found in Baikal”. The story described the lost gold as “one of the great mysteries” of the Russian Revolution.

Read moreRussia: Lost Gold Of Tsars Found In Lake Baikal, The World’s Deepest Lake