New York Times Columnist Roger Cohen Wins Our 2012 Idiot Of The Year Award

Update:

Busted! Co-Author Of Stanford Study That Bashed Organics Found To Have Deep Ties To Big Tobacco’s Anti-Science Propaganda


Do you buy organic food? New York Times writer calls you a delusional cult member suckered into a ‘fable’ (Natural News, Sep 6, 2012)

The assault on the organic industry is in full swing today, and it’s an attack not merely on the industry itself but an attack on your sanity. If you “believe” in organic foods and non-GMOs, you are about to be labeled a delusional conspiracy theorist.

How do I know that? Because the lying mainstream media is rolling out the idea that organics are a “fable,” a fairy tale myth. In one of the most idiotic, corporate-serving editorials I’ve ever seen, New York Times columnist Roger Cohen starts off with the title, “The Organic Fable.” He then goes on to call organics a false “ideology,” sort of a like a pseudoscientific cult.

He says, “Organic is a fable of the pampered parts of the planet — romantic and comforting,” and talks about how it has “a cult following.” (http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/07/opinion/roger-cohen-the-organic-fab…)

Read moreNew York Times Columnist Roger Cohen Wins Our 2012 Idiot Of The Year Award

‘Now Is The Season For Japan’ (New York Times)

WTF!


Now Is the Season for Japan (New York Times, March 22, 2012):

ONE bright early spring morning this month, I took myself to Ryoanji, the Kyoto temple that is home to the world’s most celebrated rock garden. There was not a single other foreigner in the place. Not even many Japanese were visible across the 120-acre compound (I’d scheduled my trip for spring break, when clamorous school tours are less in evidence).

So as I sat above the enigmatic presentation of 15 rocks, arranged with seeming randomness across a wide bed of raked sand, I could hear nothing but bird song from the cherry trees around me. A trickle of water from a thin bamboo chute issued into a stone basin around the corner, deepening as it intensified the silence. The characters around the basin said, “What you have is all you need.”

Stillness, spaciousness and undistractedness are what I had just then. Though foreign tourism to Japan as a whole plunged by 50 percent in the three months following the earthquake last March, as of January 2012 it was only 4 percent lower, according to the Japan National Tourism Organization.

Nevertheless, the quiet amplitude that is one of the special graces of Japan has a new resonance this year. On the surface, the country that greets someone arriving from San Francisco or New York tomorrow is startlingly similar to the place you would have seen two years ago, despite last year’s catastrophe. But deep down, Japan seems more vulnerable, and thus more wide open, than ever.

The 9.0 earthquake, tsunami and nuclear meltdown that hit the country on March 11, 2011, claimed almost 20,000 lives, overturned an economy that had already been foundering through 20 years of recession, and demoralized a citizenry dealing with one suicide every 17 minutes, a loss of direction, and what is now seven prime ministers in fewer than six years.

Yet it also highlighted the resilience, self-possession and community-mindedness that are so striking in Japan; suddenly, the country that had seemed to insist on its difference from the rest of the world could be seen in its more human, compassionate and brave dimensions. Japan has long been what the globally savvy magazine Monocle called, in a recent issue, “The World’s Most Charming Nation”; now it is also one of those most grateful for visitors.

Read more‘Now Is The Season For Japan’ (New York Times)

New York Times about to shut down the Boston Globe

The New York Times Co. said last night that it is notifying federal authorities of its plans to shut down the Boston Globe, raising the possibility that New England’s most storied newspaper could cease to exist within weeks.

After down-to-the-wire negotiations did not produce millions of dollars in union concessions, the Times Co. said that it will file today a required 60-day notice of the planned shutdown under the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification law.

The move could amount to a negotiating ploy to extract further concessions from the Globe’s unions, since the notice does not require the Times Co. to close the paper after 60 days. Talks between the two sides continued early today, wire services reported, after a midnight deadline to forge an agreement came and went. The threat of a shutdown puts the unions under fierce pressure to produce additional savings; the Boston Newspaper Guild promptly called the step a “bullying” tactic by the company.

Some industry observers have expressed skepticism that Times Co. Chairman Arthur Sulzberger Jr. would want his legacy to include the shuttering of the Globe, which his company bought in 1993.

But the Times Co. itself is under strong financial pressure. It recently mortgaged its new Manhattan headquarters, borrowed $250 million from a Mexican billionaire at 14 percent interest, laid off 100 newsroom staffers and cut salaries by 5 percent.

Read moreNew York Times about to shut down the Boston Globe

The New York Times Co. to Borrow Against Its Headquarters Building

The New York Times Company plans to borrow up to $225 million against its mid-Manhattan headquarters building, to ease a potential cash flow squeeze as the company grapples with tighter credit and shrinking profits.

The company has retained Cushman & Wakefield, the real estate firm, to act as its agent to secure financing, either in the form of a mortgage or a sale-leaseback arrangement, said James M. Follo, the Times Company’s chief financial officer.

The Times Company owns 58 percent of the 52-story, 1.5 million-square-foot tower on Eighth Avenue, which was designed by the architect Renzo Piano, and completed last year. The developer Forest City Ratner owns the rest of the building. The Times Company’s portion of the building is not currently mortgaged, and some investors have complained that the company has too much of its capital tied up in that real estate.

Read moreThe New York Times Co. to Borrow Against Its Headquarters Building

The New York Times: Making Nuclear Extermination Respectable

On July 18, 2008 The New York Times published an article by Israeli-Jewish historian, Professor Benny Morris, advocating an Israeli nuclear-genocidal attack on Iran with the likelihood of killing 70 million Iranians – 12 times the number of Jewish victims in the Nazi holocaust:

” Iran ‘s leaders would do well to rethink their gamble and suspend their nuclear program. Barring this, the best they could hope for is that Israel ‘s conventional air assault will destroy their nuclear facilities. To be sure, this would mean thousands of Iranian casualties and international humiliation. But the alternative is an Iran turned into a nuclear wasteland.”

Morris is a frequent lecturer and consultant to the Israeli political and military establishment and has unique access to Israeli strategic military planners. Morris’ advocacy and public support of the massive, brutal expulsion of all Palestinians is on public record. Yet his genocidal views have not precluded his receiving numerous academic awards. His writings and views are published in Israel ‘s leading newspapers and journals. Morris’ views are not the idle ranting of a marginal psychopath, as witnessed by the recent publication of his latest op-ed article in the New York Times.

Read moreThe New York Times: Making Nuclear Extermination Respectable