Lifestyle Changes Boost Enzyme Regulating Cell Aging

TUESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) — Major lifestyle changes can help improve levels of an enzyme called telomerase that controls cell aging, say California researchers.

Telomerase repairs and lengthens telomeres, which are DNA-protein complexes at the end of chromosomes that directly affect how quickly cells age. As telomeres become shorter and their structural integrity weakens, cells age and die more quickly, according to background information in a University of California, Irvine, new release. Shortening of telomeres is emerging as a marker of disease risk and premature death in many types of cancer, including prostate, lung, breast and colorectal cancers.

Read moreLifestyle Changes Boost Enzyme Regulating Cell Aging

Moderate Exercise Greatly Extends Lifespan

(NaturalNews) A moderate increase in fitness level can decrease a man’s risk of dying by between 50 and 70 percent, according to a study conducted by the Exercise Testing and Research Lab at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Washington, and published in the journal Circulation.

Highly recommended:
Ancient Secret of the Fountain of Youth (Book1) Great exercises!
Ancient Secret of the Fountain of Youth (Book2)
The Biology Of Belief
The Wisdom of Your Cells
Life and Teaching of the Masters of the Far East

Related article: Scientists stop the ageing process

“It is important to emphasize that it takes relatively moderate levels of physical activity – like brisk walking – to attain the associated health benefits,” said researcher Peter Kokkinos. “Certainly, one does not need to be a marathon runner. This is the message that we need to convey to the public.”

Researchers studied more than 15,000 male U.S. veterans, 6,749 black and 8,911 white. The men had been given standardized treadmill tests, in which they were encouraged to walk until they were tired, then monitored for an average of 7.5 years each.

Read moreModerate Exercise Greatly Extends Lifespan

Scientists stop the ageing process

There is more to life. The human body was not designed to “fall apart”.

Nobel Prize winner Dr. Alexis Carrel was able to keep cells from a chicken heart alive and replicating new cells for 28 years, far outliving the life of a chicken which is 7 to 12 years. The cells did not die of aging they simply terminated the experiment.

“The cell is immortal. It is merely the fluid in which it floats that degenerates. Renew this fluid at regular intervals, give the cell what it requires for nutrition, and as far as we know, the pulsation of life can go on forever.” – Dr. Alexis Carroll, Nobel Prize Winner

Highly Recommended:
The Biology Of Belief
The Wisdom of Your Cells
Life and Teaching of the Masters of the Far East

More here: (Health & Science) (Gesundheit & Wissenschaft)
___________________________________________________________________________


Clean bill of health: Scientists have shown that clearing damaged protein from the liver helps stop age decline in the organ (Source: iStockphoto)

Scientists have stopped the ageing process in an entire organ for the first time, a study released today says.

Published in today’s online edition of Nature Medicine, researchers at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Yeshiva University in New York City also say the older organs function as well as they did when the host animal was younger.

The researchers, led by Associate Professor Ana Maria Cuervo, blocked the ageing process in mice livers by stopping the build-up of harmful proteins inside the organ’s cells.

Read moreScientists stop the ageing process

Tom Parr lived 152 Years

Related articles:
Westminster Abbey
BNET
Wikipedia

Recommended Books (Amazon):
Life and Teaching of the Masters of the Far East by Baird Spalding

The Biology Of Belief: Unleashing The Power… Lipton, Bruce Ph.D.
(Best Science Book 2006 (usabooknews.com))

Empfohlene Bücher (Amazon):

Leben und Lehren der Meister im Fernen Osten Baird Spalding

Intelligente Zellen Lipton, Bruce Ph.D.

Intelligente Zellen, DVD-Video Lipton, Bruce Ph.D.


Medicine: A Challenge to Tom Parr

Source: Time Magazine

In 1944 the American Medical Association gave its distinguished service medal to wiry, twinkle-eyed Dr. George Dock, of Pasadena, Calif. Last week at the Los Angeles County Medical Association Building, 300 physicians closer to home honored the 90-year-old doctor by turning out to attend the tenth annual George Dock lecture.

The old scholar, who has given up the practice of internal medicine to spend his days improving the Los Angeles County Medical Association library, could not get to the lecture this year: he was confined to his home with a mild case of dysentery. But he got a great deal of satisfaction in knowing that the meeting was well attended and that his colleagues were showing a very lively interest in the history of medicine.*

In at the Birth. The lecture series was begun ten years ago to honor Dr. Dock as any good physician would like most to be honored-by encouraging interest in his pet subject, medical history. But Historian Dock had never neglected the other four main areas of his profession-practice, writing, research and teaching.

To the younger physicians and medical students in last week’s audience, Dr. Dock seemed almost a relic of the last century. He was in fact one of the eagerly assisting midwives at the birth of modern medicine.

He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania’s Medical School in 1884, before the X ray was discovered. He was a student, and later an associate, of the great Sir William Osier, who died 30 years ago. He was one of the first men to recognize leukemia and Hodgkin’s disease as tumors rather than infections. He published the first successful diagnosis on a living patient of the disease now called coronary thrombosis, and made microscopic post-mortem sections of coronary arteries a full 25 years before the process was generally understood.

Out in the Clinic. Since 1888, Dr. Dock has contributed 158 papers to medical journals on an astonishing variety of subjects, the titles of which give a clue to his wry humor and firm thoroughness, e.g., The Advantage of Using Potassium Iodide Until We Have Something Better, Spelling As An Index to the Preparation of the Preparation of the Medical Student. He was one of the first full-time professors of medicine in the U.S. (at Washington University in St. Louis). As a precise, energetic professor at the University of Michigan until 1908, he was the first teacher willing to make the clinic rounds white-jacketed like his students, helped give the school its reputation as one of the country’s finest medical colleges.

Last year, when he was able to attend the ninth George Dock lecture, Dr. Dock, then a mere 89, told his colleagues: “I would like to live as long as Tom Parr.”

Nobody was sure who Tom Parr was, but Los Angeles Urologist Elmer Belt went searching through his medical books in the systematic way that Dr. Dock would appreciate. Finally, buried deep in a volume of The Works of William Harvey (discoverer of the circulatory system), Dr. Belt found a four-page chapter titled: Anatomical Examination Of The Body Of Thomas Parr. It began: “Thomas Parr, a poor countryman, born near Winnington, in the County of Salop [England] died on the 14th of November in the Year of Grace 1635, after having lived 152 years and nine months and survived nine princes.”

Read moreTom Parr lived 152 Years

New Hints Seen That Red Wine May Slow Aging

Red wine may be much more potent than was thought in extending human lifespan, researchers say in a new report that is likely to give impetus to the rapidly growing search for longevity drugs.

The study is based on dosing mice with resveratrol, an ingredient of some red wines. Some scientists are already taking resveratrol in capsule form, but others believe it is far too early to take the drug, especially using wine as its source, until there is better data on its safety and effectiveness.

The report is part of a new wave of interest in drugs that may enhance longevity. On Monday, Sirtris, a startup founded in 2004 to develop drugs with the same effects as resveratrol, completed its sale to GlaxoSmithKline for $720 million.

Sirtris is seeking to develop drugs that activate protein agents known in people as sirtuins.

“The upside is so huge that if we are right, the company that dominates the sirtuin space could dominate the pharmaceutical industry and change medicine,” Dr. David Sinclair of the Harvard Medical School, a co-founder of the company, said Tuesday.

(And like always in these studies scientists want to isolate a miracle ingredient so that the corporations, “Big Pharma”, can sell it for a very high price and protect their profit monopole through a patent on it.

This the same completely backwards, unholistic approach that western medicine is using. An apple that has very little Vitamin C, but if you look at the synergy effect of those ingredients an apple is equivalent to 1500mg of Vitamin C! So trust nature.

And such News are always represented in an “Divide et Impera” way!

1-2 glasses Wine are just excellent for your health.  – The Infinite Unknown)

Read moreNew Hints Seen That Red Wine May Slow Aging

Expect new drugs to treat aging, researchers say

Resveratrol, substance found in red wine, benefits health

NEW YORK — Is 90 the new 50?

Not yet, aging researchers say, but medical breakthroughs to significantly extend life and ease the ailments of getting older are closer than many people think.

“The general public has no idea what’s coming,” said David Sinclair, a Harvard Medical School professor who has made headlines with research into the health benefits of a substance found in red wine called resveratrol.

Speaking on a panel of aging experts, Sinclair had the boldest predictions. He said scientists can greatly increase longevity and improve health in lab animals like mice, and that drugs to benefit people are on the way.

“It’s not an if, but a when,” said Sinclair, who co-founded Sirtris Pharmaceuticals to pursue such drugs. The company, which is testing medicine in people with Type 2 diabetes, was recently bought for $720 million by GlaxoSmithKline, the world’s second-largest drug maker.

Read moreExpect new drugs to treat aging, researchers say