Scientists won the Nobel Prize in medicine for ‘immortality enzyme’ and research on cell division

Immortality!

Related information:

Dr. Bruce Lipton is a former medical school professor and research scientist:
Dr. Bruce Lipton Ph.D. – Changing Our Cells by Thought
Bruce Lipton – The New Biology – Where Mind and Matter Meet
(I highly recommended this video. This will change your life. If you do not want to change and stay all the same, then don’t you dare watching it!)

The following books are not about religion, sects, cults, gurus or new age channels:
Life and Teaching of the Masters of the Far East, Vol. 1 Price: $8.76
Life and Teaching of the Masters of the Far East, Vol. 2 Price: $10.95
Life and Teaching of the Masters of the Far East, Vol. 3 Price: $10.95
In German:
Leben und Lehren der Meister in Fernen Osten. Band 1-3 Preis: EUR 12,95

Proof that miraculous abilities are indeed real:
China’s Super Psychics (At the moment this book (in English) is only available at ridiculous prices.)
In German:
Indigo-Schulen: Trainingsmethoden für medial begabte Kinder Preis: EUR 8,95
(The German title is complete BS. ‘Super Psychics’ is a lot better, but would you have guessed that this includes healing abilities, teleportation, biolocation and manifesting out of thin air etc.?)

Watch also:
Ling Kong Jing (Empty Force) Demo by Master Shr on Bill Moyers Special
Qigong master (Realy cool Must see! ): (This master appears to be mentally unstable but he has great abilities.)
Qigong Master Boils Water With His Hands Pyrokinesis

My Tai Chi and Qi Gong teachers can also do the ‘miraculous’. For them it’s ‘normal’. They can perform Ling Kong Jing (Empty Force) at any given distance. Such abilities are real.


nobel-prize-medicne-2009
Pictures of the winners of the Nobel Prize in medicine, from left, Elizabeth Blackburn, Carol Greider and Jack Szostak, are displayed on a screen at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm (AFP)

Oct. 5 (Bloomberg) — Three American scientists won the Nobel Prize in medicine for research on cell division and the “immortality enzyme” that can help cells multiply without damage, illuminating conditions including cancer and aging.

Elizabeth Blackburn, 60, a professor at the University of California in San Francisco; Carol Greider, 48, a professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore; and Jack Szostak, 56, a professor at Harvard Medical School in Boston, will share the 10 million-Swedish kronor ($1.4 million) prize equally, the Nobel Assembly said today in Stockholm. It’s the first time two women have jointly won the prize.

Their research explored a fundamental question of life: how chromosomes that carry the genetic code in DNA are copied in their entirety each time a cell divides. The key is the end of the chromosome, where caps known as telomeres reside. An enzyme discovered by the researchers, dubbed telomerase, prevents the end from being shaved off and maintains the health of the cell as it replicates — earning it the title of “immortality enzyme.”

“This is this really a tribute to curiosity-driven basic science,” Greider said today at a press conference at the Johns Hopkins campus with her two children, ages 9 and 13, in the audience. “We were just interested in the fundamental question of cell biology.”

Read moreScientists won the Nobel Prize in medicine for ‘immortality enzyme’ and research on cell division

Scientists take a step closer to an elixir of youth


The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.  –  Lao Tzu

A naturally occuring substance that can create “immortal cells” could be the key to finding a real elixir of youth, scientists claim.

Researchers believe boosting the amount of a naturally forming enzyme in the body could prevent cells dying and so lead to extended, healthier, lifespans..

The protein telomerase helps maintain the protective caps at the ends of chromosomes which act like the ends of shoelaces and stop them unravelling.

As we age, and our cells divide, these caps become frayed and shorter and eventually are so damaged that the cell dies. Scientists believe boosting our natural levels of telomerase could rejuvenate them.

A team at the Spanish National Cancer Centre in Madrid tested the theory on mice and found that those genetically engineered to produce 10 times the normal levels of telomerase lived 50 per cent longer than normal.

Read moreScientists take a step closer to an elixir of youth

Scientists stop the ageing process

There is more to life. The human body was not designed to “fall apart”.

Nobel Prize winner Dr. Alexis Carrel was able to keep cells from a chicken heart alive and replicating new cells for 28 years, far outliving the life of a chicken which is 7 to 12 years. The cells did not die of aging they simply terminated the experiment.

“The cell is immortal. It is merely the fluid in which it floats that degenerates. Renew this fluid at regular intervals, give the cell what it requires for nutrition, and as far as we know, the pulsation of life can go on forever.” – Dr. Alexis Carroll, Nobel Prize Winner

Highly Recommended:
The Biology Of Belief
The Wisdom of Your Cells
Life and Teaching of the Masters of the Far East

More here: (Health & Science) (Gesundheit & Wissenschaft)
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Clean bill of health: Scientists have shown that clearing damaged protein from the liver helps stop age decline in the organ (Source: iStockphoto)

Scientists have stopped the ageing process in an entire organ for the first time, a study released today says.

Published in today’s online edition of Nature Medicine, researchers at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Yeshiva University in New York City also say the older organs function as well as they did when the host animal was younger.

The researchers, led by Associate Professor Ana Maria Cuervo, blocked the ageing process in mice livers by stopping the build-up of harmful proteins inside the organ’s cells.

Read moreScientists stop the ageing process

The Future Is Now? Pretty Soon, at Least

Before we get to Ray Kurzweil’s plan for upgrading the “suboptimal software” in your brain, let me pass on some of the cheery news he brought to the World Science Festival last week in New York.

Do you have trouble sticking to a diet? Have patience. Within 10 years, Dr. Kurzweil explained, there will be a drug that lets you eat whatever you want without gaining weight.

Worried about greenhouse gas emissions? Have faith. Solar power may look terribly uneconomical at the moment, but with the exponential progress being made in nanoengineering, Dr. Kurzweil calculates that it’ll be cost-competitive with fossil fuels in just five years, and that within 20 years all our energy will come from clean sources.

Are you depressed by the prospect of dying? Well, if you can hang on another 15 years, your life expectancy will keep rising every year faster than you’re aging. And then, before the century is even half over, you can be around for the Singularity, that revolutionary transition when humans and/or machines start evolving into immortal beings with ever-improving software.

At least that’s Dr. Kurzweil’s calculation. It may sound too good to be true, but even his critics acknowledge he’s not your ordinary sci-fi fantasist. He is a futurist with a track record and enough credibility for the National Academy of Engineering to publish his sunny forecast for solar energy.

He makes his predictions using what he calls the Law of Accelerating Returns, a concept he illustrated at the festival with a history of his own inventions for the blind. In 1976, when he pioneered a device that could scan books and read them aloud, it was the size of a washing machine.

Two decades ago he predicted that “early in the 21st century” blind people would be able to read anything anywhere using a handheld device. In 2002 he narrowed the arrival date to 2008. On Thursday night at the festival, he pulled out a new gadget the size of a cellphone, and when he pointed it at the brochure for the science festival, it had no trouble reading the text aloud.

This invention, Dr. Kurzweil said, was no harder to anticipate than some of the predictions he made in the late 1980s, like the explosive growth of the Internet in the 1990s and a computer chess champion by 1998. (He was off by a year – Deep Blue’s chess victory came in 1997.)

Read moreThe Future Is Now? Pretty Soon, at Least