New York Paralyzed As Subways Shut Down Indefinitely: Subway Chief: ‘Worst Disaster Ever’

New York Paralyzed As Subways Shut Down Indefinitely: Subway Chief: “Worst Disaster Ever” (ZeroHedge, Oct 30, 2012):

As everyone who has been to New York City knows, without its underground arteries – the subway system – the city is if not dead, than certainly in an indefinite coma. By that logic, New York will not get out of the critical ward for many days, because hours ago the head of the New York City’s transit system just called Hurricane Sandy “the most devastating event to the city’s subway system ever.” At last check seven subway tunnels under the East River had flooded, as did the Queens Midtown Tunnel—and Metropolitan Transit Authority chairman Joseph Lhota said there is “no firm timeline” for when the system would be back up and running. According to other MTA employees it would take between 14 hours and 4 days just to pump the water out of the subway system. We’ll take the over. And as long as there are no subways, there are no clerical and support workers, there is no Wall Street, there is no beating heart to the city.

Read moreNew York Paralyzed As Subways Shut Down Indefinitely: Subway Chief: ‘Worst Disaster Ever’

Nuclear Power Plant Alert As Superstorm Sandy Expected To Hit 26 Nuclear Facilities Along Its Path

See also:

Hurricane Sandy: New Jersey Oyster Creek Nuclear Plant SFP Cooling Could Be Stopped If Water Levels At The Plant Rise 6 More Inches

Nation’s Oldest Nuclear Power Plant, New Jersey’s Oyster Creek, Declares Alert Following Water Surge


Nuclear plant alert as 26 facilities in Sandy’s path (RT, Oct 29/30, 2012):

Parts of two nuclear power plants were shut down and another one put on alert, as the ‘Superstorm’ Sandy ravished the US East Coast. The storm may hit as many as 26 of the nuclear facilities along its path.

­A unit at Indian Point plant north of New York City was shut down on Monday due to an external grid issue, the plant operator said. The facility itself and its employees are not at risk, the Entergy Corp. said.

At the Salem plant in Hancocks Bridge, New Jersey, a unit was shut down Tuesday, because four of its six circulating water pumps were no longer available, PSEG Nuclear reported.

Read moreNuclear Power Plant Alert As Superstorm Sandy Expected To Hit 26 Nuclear Facilities Along Its Path

Superstorm Sandy Blaze Video: Fire Rips Through Breezy Point, Queens, 50 Houses Destroyed (Video)


YouTube Added: 30.10.2012

Description:

Explosions, fires, and floods have devastated New York, killing at least six people statewide. Hurricane Sandy left dozens of houses ablaze as it hit the city while flooding at least seven subway tunnels and overwhelming the emergency services. First reports of major fire were coming in from the Rockaway Park area of Queens, New York. A few hours later, fire engulfed 15 houses in Breezy Point, Queens, and 190 firefighters were on site battling the blaze. Fire has reportedly destroyed 50 houses.

Hurricane Sandy: New Jersey Oyster Creek Nuclear Plant SFP Cooling Could Be Stopped If Water Levels At The Plant Rise 6 More Inches

U.S. nuclear plant declares “alert” after Sandy storm surge: NRC (Reuters)

Exelon Corp declared an “alert” at its New Jersey Oyster Creek nuclear power plant due to a record storm surge, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission said, warning that a further water rise could force the country’s oldest working plant to use emergency water supplies to cool spent uranium fuel rods.

The alert — the second lowest of four NRC action levels — came after water levels at the plant rose by more than 6.5 feet, potentially affecting the pumps that circulate water through the plant, an NRC spokesman said late on Monday.

Those pumps are not essential since the 43-year-old plant was shut for planned refueling since October 22. However, a further rise to 7 feet could submerge the service water pump motor that is used to cool the water in the spent fuel pool.

Exelon said in a statement that there was no danger to equipment and no threat to public health or safety.

The incident at Oyster Creek, which is about 60 miles east of Philadelphia on the New Jersey Coast, came as Sandy made landfall as the largest Atlantic storm ever, bringing up to 90 mile per hour (mph) winds and 13-foot storm surges in the biggest test of the industry’s emergency preparedness since the Fukushima disaster in Japan a year and a half ago.

Read moreHurricane Sandy: New Jersey Oyster Creek Nuclear Plant SFP Cooling Could Be Stopped If Water Levels At The Plant Rise 6 More Inches

Superstorm Sandy: At Least 16 Deaths, 7.5 MILLION WITHOUT POWER (Video)

At least 16 deaths, 7.5 million without power in Superstorm Sandy’s wake (Chicago Tribune, Oct 30, 2012):

Superstorm Sandy slammed into the New Jersey coastline with 80 mph winds Monday night and hurled an unprecedented 13-foot surge of seawater at New York City, flooding its tunnels, subway stations and the electrical system that powers Wall Street.

At least 16 U.S. deaths were blamed on the storm, which brought the presidential campaign to a halt a week before Election Da. Sandy also killed 66 people in the Caribbean.

For New York City at least, Sandy was not the days-long onslaught many had feared, and the wind and rain that sent water sloshing into Manhattan from three sides began dying down within hours.

Still, the power was out for hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers and an estimated 7.5 million people altogether across the East. The full extent of the storm’s damage across the region was unclear, and unlikely to be known until daybreak.Stock trading will be closed in the U.S. for a second day Tuesday — the first time the New York Stock Exchange will be closed for two consecutive days due to weather since 1888, when a blizzard struck the city.

Read moreSuperstorm Sandy: At Least 16 Deaths, 7.5 MILLION WITHOUT POWER (Video)

Nation’s Oldest Nuclear Power Plant, New Jersey’s Oyster Creek, Declares Alert Following Water Surge

Nation’s Oldest Nuclear Power Plant, New Jersey’s Oyster Creek, Declares Alert Following Water Surge (ZeroHedge, Oct 29, 2012):

As a reminder, the biggest catastrophe that resulted from last year’s Tohoku earthquake in Japan was not the earthquake itself, nor the infrastructure destruction from the susbequent tsunami, but the impact of the soaring water wall on the nuclear power plants in the coastline, namely Fukushima, and its aftermath, by now known all too well to all. So tonight too, all along the east coast, the biggest threat is not the wind, nor the rain, but the impact of the storm surge on the tens of nuclear power plants located in the vicinity of the rapidly rising tide. Such as Oyster Creek in New Jersey which just went on alert due to the surging water level.

From AP:

The nation’s oldest nuclear power plant is on alert after waters from a colossal storm reached high levels.

Read moreNation’s Oldest Nuclear Power Plant, New Jersey’s Oyster Creek, Declares Alert Following Water Surge

NYC: 670,000 Without Power, ConEd Says Repairs Could Take A Week – Interactive Status Map

670,000 Without Power, ConEd Says Repairs Could Take A Week – Interactive Status Map (ZeroHedge, Oct 29, 2012):

The good news is that no workers are trapped. The bad news is that between the 14th Street transformer explosion and the flooding and damage elsewhere, there are 670,000 people without power and over 230,000 of them are in Manhattan.

  • *CON ED SAYS UNDERGROUND SUBSTATIONS COULD BE UP IN 3 TO 4 DAYS
  • *CON ED SAYS IT WILL TAKE LONGER TO REPAIR ABOVE GROUND STATIONS
  • *CON ED SAYS IT COULD BE UP TO A WEEK FOR POWER RESTORATION
  • *LARGEST STORM RELATED OUTAGE IN CON ED HISTORY, MIKSAD SAYS

Full list of current outages in New York City (hardest hit are Cooper Square, Canal, Jamaica, Chelsea, and Borough Hill):

Read moreNYC: 670,000 Without Power, ConEd Says Repairs Could Take A Week – Interactive Status Map

Postcards From An Underwater New York

Postcards From An Underwater New York (ZeroHedge, Oct 29, 2012):

Once the surge levees break, the water level just soars and covers everything in a “reverse Titanic” as the following pictures demonstrate:

Ground Zero (via AP)

Hoboken PATH station (via @garywhitta)

Avenue C and 13th Street (via iWitness Weather):

Lower East Side:

The Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel is flooding… (via @NewsBreaker)

The Belt Parkway fully underwater

Stunning view of the lower manhattan black out (via @nicksummers)

14th Street Transformer exploding! (via @georgeweld)

Floating Cop cars in lower east side (via  David Schulz)

 

More as we see it.

 

Once the surge levees break, the water level just soars and covers everything in a “reverse Titanic” as the following pictures demonstrate:

Ground Zero (via AP)

Hoboken PATH station (via @garywhitta)

Avenue C and 13th Street (via iWitness Weather):

Lower East Side:

The Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel is flooding… (via @NewsBreaker)

The Belt Parkway fully underwater

Stunning view of the lower manhattan black out (via @nicksummers)

14th Street Transformer exploding! (via @georgeweld)

Floating Cop cars in lower east side (via  David Schulz)

 

More as we see it.