Gulf Of Mexico Water Sample EXPLODES! Other Samples Prove To Be Toxic

See also:

BP oil spill: Michelle Obama urges US holidaymakers to support Gulf coast (Guardian):

America’s first lady criticised by conservative bloggers as Obama family’s next holiday destination revealed as Maine.



Added: 17. July 2010

Don’t miss:

Toxicologists: Corexit ‘Ruptures Red Blood Cells, Causes Internal Bleeding’, ‘Allows Crude Oil To Penetrate ‘Into The Cells’ and ‘Every Organ System’ (!)

U.S. Senate Traitors Block Investigative Power for Oil Spill Commission (!)

Warning To Gulf Volunteers: Almost Every Cleanup Worker From The 1989 Exxon Valdez Disaster Is Now Dead (!)

CNN: 1st Amendment, Free Press Suspended Near Gulf Disaster Area

Gulf of Mexico Disaster: BP Slick Covers Dolphins and Whales

BP burns rare sea turtles alive, blocks efforts to save them

Matt Simmons: ‘We’re going to have to evacuate the gulf states.’

US Scientist: Methane In Gulf ‘Astonishingly High’, As Much As 1 Million Times The Normal Level

Big Pharma Nanotechnology Encodes Drugs With Tracking Data That You (Have To) Swallow

equilibrium
The future: No chance to discontinue the medicine! Watch the movie.

Related information:

The New World Order is here:

Novartis microchip to help ensure patients take their medicine (!)

If nanotechnology is the future, then your chances that you have a future are dim:

Nanoparticles used in untested swine flu vaccines:

There is only one small problem with vaccines containing nanoparticles, they can be deadly and at the least cause severe irreparable health damage.

Nanotechnology In Food And Packaging Accepted By Consumers

104 products on shelves already contain toxic ‘grey goo’ by stealth, say Friends of the Earth

Nanotechnology is NOT bad, it is like a knife, it depends on how we use it:

Air-purifying Church Windows Were Early Nanotechnology


(NaturalNews) The emerging field of nanotechnology is currently gaining a lot of attention across many industries. Nanotechnology allows scientists to manipulate individual atoms and molecules to create unique materials and even micro-scale devices, and this is leading to a wide range of applications in clothing, textiles, electronics and even food and medicine.

Sounds great, right? Except for the fact that, like genetic modification of food crops, nanotechnology tampers with Mother Nature in a way that’s largely untested for safety. And here’s something really bizarre: The pharmaceutical industry may soon begin using nanotechnology to encode drug tablets and capsules with brand and tracking data that you swallow as part of the pill.

To really explain how this works, let me simplify how nanotechnology works so you’ll see why this is so bizarre (and potentially dangerous). Instead of using materials and elements as they’re found in nature to build and construct things, nanotechnologists are deconstructing the basic building blocks of these materials and elements to make completely new ones. In other words, nanoscientists are reconstructing the molecular building blocks of our world without yet knowing what it will do to humans and to the environment.

The long-term consequences of nanotechnology are still largely unknown because not a single formidable study has ever been conducted on this emerging science that proves it to be safe. In fact, most of the studies that have been conducted on nanotechnology show that it’s actually detrimental to health and to the environment (which I’ll cover further, below).

Read moreBig Pharma Nanotechnology Encodes Drugs With Tracking Data That You (Have To) Swallow

Al Gore’s Enormous Carbon Footprint

California welcomes the Poodle of Lurve

al-gore-carbon-footprint
(Click on image to enlarge.)

Looking across at the US blogosphere, sometimes, I realise what a horrid, mean-spirited fellow I am. All I seem to want to do is say unpleasant things about green nutcases, libtards and pompous, preening, moustachioed Guardian assistant editors. In the US, on the other hand, they still observe the common courtesies. Look at this charming ad the boys at I Hate The Media took out to welcome their newest celebrity local.

They must have known how things difficult are at the moment for Al, what with those appalling allegations about an attempted drunken sexual assault on a Portland, Oregon massage therapist. (Not that you want to read all the lurid details, but if any of your servants do, you might direct them to this link to the police report). I’m sure their helpful advice will cheer him up no end. (Hat tip: Peter Murphy)

Read moreAl Gore’s Enormous Carbon Footprint

Amazon River Dolphins Being Slaughtered for Bait

amazon-river-dolphins
An Amazon river dolphin emerges from Ariau River in Rio Negro, Brazil, in July 2008. Scientists say the species is seriously threatened by fishermen who slaughter the animals to use their flesh as fishing bait.

RIO DE JANEIRO (July 11) — The bright pink color gives them a striking appearance in the muddy jungle waters. That Amazon river dolphins are also gentle and curious makes them easy targets for nets and harpoons as they swim fearlessly up to fishing boats.

Now, their carcasses are showing up in record numbers on riverbanks, their flesh torn away for fishing bait, causing researchers to warn of a growing threat to a species that has already disappeared in other parts of the world.

“The population of the river dolphins will collapse if these fishermen are not stopped from killing them,” said Vera da Silva, the top aquatic mammals expert at the government’s Institute of Amazonian Research. “We’ve been studying an area of 11,000 hectares for 17 years, and of late the population is dropping 7 percent each year.”

That translates to about 1,500 dolphins killed annually in the part of the Mamiraua Reserve of the western Amazon where da Silva studies the mammals.

Da Silva said researchers first began finding dolphin carcasses along riverbanks around the year 2000. They were obviously killed by human hands: sliced open and quartered, with their flesh cut away.

Read moreAmazon River Dolphins Being Slaughtered for Bait

David de Rothschild Shocked By Amount Of Plastic In Ocean

Special thanks to the Rothschild family and all the other elite criminals, who keep all those advanced, free technologies, that could turn planet earth back into paradise, from humanity.


David de Rothschild set out on a mammoth ocean crossing aboard his recycled yacht to highlight pollution of Earth’s waters – but even he was shocked by what he found

plastiki-david-de-rothschild The weather closes in on the Plastiki, above. The recycled plastic bottle boat is due to complete its 7,000-mile voyage in Sydney in two weeks’ time.

“After 100 days at sea,” David de Rothschild suggests, “you realise that it should be called planet Ocean rather than planet Earth.” De Rothschild is speaking from the island of New Caledonia – “an odd little bit of France in the South Seas” – the night before his boat, the Plastiki, embarks on the final leg of a voyage that should finish in Sydney harbour in a fortnight.

The Plastiki, a revolutionary catamaran, is kept afloat by 12,500 plastic bottles in its hulls; the “eco-adventure” has been designed to draw attention to our systematic pollution and over-fishing of oceans. In the three and a half months since De Rothschild, the refusenik 31-year-old son of the banking dynasty, and his crew of five set out from San Francisco they have discovered many things, but mainly, he says, they have learned about the sea, about its power and about its fragility.

The power was amply demonstrated on the leg of the journey just completed, the 1,700 miles from Samoa, during which the vessel’s unconventional construction was rigorously tested by 13ft swells and 35-knot winds for days on end. It is hard not to be reminded of your insignificance in the universe, De Rothschild says, when hanging off the side of a yacht made partly of plastic bottles, 1,000 miles from land in the pitch dark, while the Pacific breaks over you.

The ocean’s fragility they witnessed in the place where much of the world’s discarded plastic ends up, the “eastern garbage patch”. This, the focus of their voyage, is a floating “continent” of debris. Nothing that the crew had read in advance could prepare them for what they found navigating an area twice as large as the North Sea. “You don’t see it at first,” De Rothschild says. “But when you get into the sea, and under the water, you realise that it is all like a soup, millions and millions of tiny fragments of plastic, suspended in the water. It is mostly microscopic, but once your eye adjusts you start to see the reflectiveness of some of the larger pieces. The red fragments stand out most clearly.”

The garbage patch was first identified 12 years ago within the “North Pacific gyre” – a vortex where the ocean circulates slowly because of light wind and extreme high pressure systems. Oceanographers have since suggested that perhaps 100 million tonnes of plastic are held in suspension in these waters. One of the things that the Plastiki voyage has demonstrated is just how durable modern polymers are: the pressurised bottles of its hull have hardly been knocked out of shape, let alone broken up by the 8,000-mile voyage. “That’s why just about every plastic bottle that has been made still exists,” De Rothschild says.

The garbage patch was first identified 12 years ago within the “North Pacific gyre” – a vortex where the ocean circulates slowly because of light wind and extreme high pressure systems. Oceanographers have since suggested that perhaps 100 million tonnes of plastic are held in suspension in these waters. One of the things that the Plastiki voyage has demonstrated is just how durable modern polymers are: the pressurised bottles of its hull have hardly been knocked out of shape, let alone broken up by the 8,000-mile voyage. “That’s why just about every plastic bottle that has been made still exists,” De Rothschild says.

The voyage has been overshadowed by the more graphic pollution of the BP oil spill, but even that is dwarfed by the scale of the problem the Plastiki highlights. While the deaths of seabirds and marine life in the Gulf of Mexico are still being measured in the hundreds, according to the UN Environment Programme, plastic debris causes the deaths of more than a million seabirds every year, and more than 100,000 marine mammals. Back in 2006, the UN concluded that every square mile of ocean contains 46,000 pieces of floating plastic. Since then the problem has only grown.

“One of the difficulties in conveying it to people,” De Rothschild says, “is that you can’t photograph it, the flecks are too small. What perhaps makes it most relevant and real for individuals is the health aspect of it. These particles are ingested by marine life and pass into our food chain. We all do it: we throw this stuff, this packaging, what I call dumb plastic, into the bin, and we think it has gone. But it comes back to us one way or another. Some of it ends up on our dinner plates.”

The voyage was inspired by Thor Heyerdahl’s Pacific journey on the Kon-Tiki in 1947. Olav Heyerdahl, the Norwegian explorer’s grandson, has been aboard for part of the Plastiki adventure. The comparison between the two voyages illustrates other aspects of the ocean’s fragility, De Rothschild believes.

“When you watch the film of Kon-Tiki and read Heyerdahl’s account, you are struck by how alive the ocean seemed then,” he says. “They were literally having to throw fish off the raft.” That has not been the Plastiki experience at all. “For us it has been much more, where is everybody? We have seen a couple of dolphins, a couple of distant whales, a few flying fish, [but] other than that, nothing.” Heyerdahl could survive on fish, but on board the Plastiki they have caught only a couple of tuna in three months, despite having their lines in the water every day. “When you start reading about 80% of the world’s fish stocks being gone, it’s hard to believe,” De Rothschild says. “But then you come out here.”

Even in the middle of the world’s largest ocean it is hard to avoid some of the habits that have created the problem. At Christmas Island, where much of the food arrives in American packaging, “popsicle bags are a scourge”. On Samoa, villages compete over recycling plans, but as soon as villagers were out of their backyard De Rothschild watched young and old throwing plastic bottles into the sea.

One of the more gratifying aspects of the voyage has been the way that the message seems to have been communicated. Plastiki has a vivid ship-to-shore blog – “talking about the ocean from the ocean” – and there has been excitement wherever they have docked. In New Caledonia, De Rothschild says, perhaps three quarters of the people who have seen the boat in the harbour said they had read about it and supported the project. That didn’t stop him witnessing one “supporter” subsequently chucking bags full of rubbish over the side of his boat. “None of us likes the idea of fouling our own nest,” he says. “But we are not good at thinking of the whole world as our nest.”

The Plastiki team do not do pessimism, though sometimes De Rothschild admits he feels like he is banging his head against a brick wall. Their own on board efforts at self-sufficiency have gone well, composting waste, powering batteries with a mixture of solar panels and bicycle-powered turbines. Even so, he is confronted by the fact that, however good your intentions, it is hard to live a life without plastic. When we speak, De Rothschild has just done the shopping for the Sydney leg of the voyage. In the supermarket all the vegetables and all the salad were wrapped in plastic. “It’s like a disease,” he says. “But we have to believe the argument can be won. Getting rid of dumb plastic, bags in particular, could be a very simple piece of legislation; making supermarkets use reusables is not so hard.”

The crew’s website is full of stories of people “doing their own Plastiki”, pledging to eliminate plastic bottles from their school or workplace, or creating a zero waste policy. De Rothschild hopes the voyage can be a metaphor for this. “We are just a bunch of citizens, we are not scientists or marine biologists, but we want to show that if we work together we can do something.”

That sense of teamwork has no doubt been tested on board the catamaran. I saw the Plastiki in San Francisco before it set off, and was struck by how limited the space was – a tiny geodesic dome of cabin – not least for the 6ft 4in de Rothschild: how have they coped?

“Usually you are so exhausted by the end of the day that you could sleep anywhere,” he says. “It’s a really odd contrast, you are on this tiny platform and yet you have this enormous space around you. It becomes a little dance, in a way: you are fantastically aware of the other people, how they move. But we have a rule that if you say ‘fuck, you are annoying me’, which we all do, then it has to be done in a spirit of jest.”

Sydney is not so far away, but there are some rough seas and weather forecast, so he is trying not to look too far ahead. “It will be a chapter over,” he says. “But we are only just beginning to get this message across. The boat will go around the world, I hope, as a symbol of that. I feel, in every sense, that we are in the calm before the storm.”

Tim Adams Sunday
11 July 2010

Source: The Observer

Toxicologists: Corexit ‘Ruptures Red Blood Cells, Causes Internal Bleeding’, ‘Allows Crude Oil To Penetrate ‘Into The Cells’ and ‘Every Organ System’

gulf-of-mexico-oil-spill

As I have previously noted, Corexit is toxic, is less effective than other dispersants, and is actually worsening the damage caused by the oil spill.

Now, two toxicologists are saying that Corexit is much more harmful to human health and marine life than we’ve been told.

Specifically Gulf toxicologist Dr. Susan Shaw – Founder and Director of the Marine Environmental Research Institute – dove into the oil spill to examine the chemicals present.

Dr. Shaw told CNN:

If I can tell you what happens – because I was in the oil – to people…

Shrimpers throwing their nets into water… [then] water from the nets splashed on his skin. …

[He experienced a] headache that lasted 3 weeks… heart palpitations… muscle spasms… bleeding from the rectum…

And that’s what that Corexit does, it ruptures red blood cells, causes internal bleeding, and liver and kidney damage. …

This stuff is so toxic combined… not the oil or dispersants alone. …

Very, very toxic and goes right through skin.

***

The reason this is so toxic is because of these solvents [from dispersant] that penetrate the skin of anything that’s going through the dispersed oil takes the oil into the cellstakes the oil into the organs… and this stuff is toxic to every organ system in the body. …

Similarly, marine biologist and toxicologist Dr. Chris Pincetich – who has an extensive background in testing the affects of chemicals on fish – says that Corexit disrupts cell membranes.

He also explains that EPA toxicity testing for Corexit is woefully inadequate, since EPA testing for mortality usually only requires a 96-hour time frame. His doctoral research found that fish that were alive at 96 hours after exposure to pesticide were dead at two weeks, so the chemicals were considered non-lethal for the purposes of the test.

Read moreToxicologists: Corexit ‘Ruptures Red Blood Cells, Causes Internal Bleeding’, ‘Allows Crude Oil To Penetrate ‘Into The Cells’ and ‘Every Organ System’

BP Oil Blowout: All States Along Gulf Of Mexico Affected By Slick

See also:

U.S. Senate Traitors Block Investigative Power for Oil Spill Commission


Tar balls from the Gulf oil spill have been found on a Texas beach, the first evidence that crude from the ruptured Deepwater Horizon well has reached all the Gulf states.

all-states-along-gulf-of-mexico-affected-by-slick
Smoke rises from the BP oil spill site, as natural gas is burned off, while the drilling of two relief wells continue in the Gulf of Mexico (Reuters)

A Coast Guard official said it was possible that the oil hitched a ride on a ship and was not carried naturally by currents to the barrier islands of the eastern Texas coast, but there was no way to know.

The amount is tiny in comparison to what has coated beaches in the hardest-hit parts of the Gulf coast in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and the Florida Panhandle but it still provoked the quick dispatch of cleaning crews and a vow that BP will pay for the trouble.

Read moreBP Oil Blowout: All States Along Gulf Of Mexico Affected By Slick

U.S. Senate Traitors Block Investigative Power for Oil Spill Commission

The elite criminals that control the US government have their puppets in both parties in the right places.

Are they protecting (Dick Cheney’s) Halliburton?

David Icke On The Gulf Oil Spill And FEMA Camps: A ‘Biblical’ Catastrophe That Will Affect Us All

Just eight days before the Gulf blow-out, Halliburton also announced that it had agreed to buy Boots & Coots for $240.4 million. Who are Boots & Coots?

The world’s largest oil-spill clean-up company which also deals with oil and gas well fires and blowouts.

What an incredibly fortunate coincidence. What a slice of luck.

Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill: The Halliburton Connection:

The company acknowledged Friday that it had completed the final cementing of the oil well and pipe just 20 hours before the blowout last week.

More coincidences:

BP CEO Tony Hayward sold £1.4 million of his shares weeks before Gulf blowout

Goldman Sachs Sold 44% Of Its BP Stock 3 Weeks Before Gulf Blowout

Rig firm makes $270m profit from Gulf of Mexico oil spill

This much is true: You have been lied to:

Warning To Gulf Volunteers: Almost Every Cleanup Worker From The 1989 Exxon Valdez Disaster Is Now Dead

And the government is NOT telling the people how contaminated the air really is that they are breathing right now.

The US government knows that many, many Americans will die from this disaster, but the government does not care about them at all.

If you are living in the Gulf region and have relatives elsewhere, call them, ask if you can stay with them for a while and leave.

If you can afford to leave the Gulf region, leave NOW.


The US House of Representatives voted 420 to 1 to give the presidential commission investigating the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico full subpoena power.

The Senate blocked it = No subpoena powers = No investigation.

—-

Transcript:

Read moreU.S. Senate Traitors Block Investigative Power for Oil Spill Commission

And Now: BP admits failing to use industry risk test at any of its deepwater wells in the US

BP was facing fresh criticism over its approach to safety on Saturday night after critics said it did not use an industry standard process to asses risk ahead of the Deepwater Horizon disaster.

bp

The procedure, known as a safety case, was developed in Britain after the catastrophic Piper Alpha oil rig explosion of 1988 in which 167 people lost their lives.

Royal Dutch Shell confirmed that it always develops safety cases – a lengthy written document – on each of its thousands of wells in the world, even though they are only mandatory in some countries.

However, BP admitted to The Sunday Telegraph that it does not use safety cases on any of its US wells, including the high-pressure deep water Macondo well from which up to 60,000 barrels of oil per day are still leaking in the Gulf of Mexico.

It is now 75 days since the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded and sank, killing 11 men and triggering the catastrophic spill.

Read moreAnd Now: BP admits failing to use industry risk test at any of its deepwater wells in the US