The Bush Bust of ’08: “It’s All Downhill From Here, Folks”

On January 14, 2008 the FDIC web site began posting the rules for reimbursing depositors in the event of a bank failure. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) is required to “determine the total insured amount for each depositor….as of the day of the failure” and return their money as quickly as possible. The agency is “modernizing its current business processes and procedures for determining deposit insurance coverage in the event of a failure of one of the largest insured depository institutions.” The implication is clear, the FDIC has begun the “death watch” on the many banks which are currently drowning in their own red ink. The problem for the FDIC is that it has never supervised a bank failure which exceeded 175,000 accounts. So the impending financial tsunami is likely to be a crash-course in crisis management. Today some of the larger banks have more than 50 million depositors, which will make the FDIC’s job nearly impossible. Good luck. – Mike Whitney

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Ron Paul has been the only hope for the U.S.

Congressman Ron Paul slammed Federal Reserve chairman Ben Bernanke during a House Financial Services Committee meeting today for following a policy of deliberately destroying the dollar and wiping out the American middle class.
Paul held Bernanke to task over his refusal to address the decline of the dollar and its clear link to inflation.
“Inflation comes from the unwise increase in the supply of money credit….to argue that we can continue to debase the currency, which is really the policy of that you’re following, purposely debasing value of currency – which to me seems so destructive….it just puts more pressure on the federal reserve to create capital out of thin air inorder to stimulate the economy and usually that just goes into mal-investment,” said Paul.
Watch it.
“Ron Paul Schools Ben Bernanke Yet Again”


Paul highlighted the fact that the M3 money supply was rising at a rate of 16 per cent and that this was the real rate of inflation.
“History is against you,” Paul told Bernanke, “History is on the side of hard money – if you look at stable prices you have to look at the only historic sound money that’s lasted more than a few years – fiat money always ends, gold is the only thing where you get stable prices,” he added, pointing out that despite the price of oil’s rapid ascent, it had remained flat when compared to the price of gold.
“I cannot see how we can continue to accept the policy of deliberately destroying the value of money as an economic value,” said Paul, adding that the policy was “immoral,” and would lead to a reduction in American’s living standards and “the middle class being wiped out.”
Asked how he could defend a policy of deliberately depreciating the dollar, Bernanke stumbled through his response and was basically forced to agree with Paul’s point. Paul’s comments come on the day that the dollar hit its all time low against the Euro.
Earlier this week, former Fed chairman Alan Greenspan laid the groundwork for the further collapse of the greenback by encouraging Gulf states to abandon their dollar peg.
Watch Paul’s opening statement.
“Ron Paul opening statement to Bernanke at FSC – 2-27-2008”

Ben Bernanke’s high-wire act

Fed chief, in first of two days of testimony on Capitol Hill, acknowledges troubling signs about economic growth but also raises concerns about inflation.

WASHINGTON (CNNMoney.com) — For Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke, running the central bank has become an increasingly challenging high-wire balancing act.

All of Wall Street was watching the Fed chairman on Wednesday when he headed to Capitol Hill to outline the trio of challenges facing the Fed: an economy at risk of falling into a recession, topsy-turvy financial markets and the rising risk of inflation.

“We do face a difficult situation,” Bernanke told members of the House Financial Services Committee, marking the first day of his two-day semi-annual hearing on the Fed’s monetary policy. “The challenge for us is to balance those risks and decide at any given time which is more serious.”

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