Apple Pulls A JP Morgan, Announces $10 Billion Share Repurchase Program, $2.65 Quarterly Dividend, Plans To Spend $45 Billion Over 3 Year

Apple Announces $10 Billion Share Repurchase Program, $2.65 Quarterly Dividend, Plans To Spend $45 Billion Over 3 Year (ZeroHedge, Mar 19, 2012):

And so Steve Jobs legacy is now gone as Apple goes Jamie Dimon. At least Apple was not part of the stress test. And as announced yesterday, we for one, can’t wait to find out if it was JPM that advised Apple, to pull a JPM. Finally, we hope that AAPL’s cash creation rate remains the same, as $45 billion in 3 years may put quite a large dent on the company’s onshore cash, which according to reports is one-third of total.

Full PR:

Apple Announces Plans to Initiate Dividend and Share Repurchase Program

Read moreApple Pulls A JP Morgan, Announces $10 Billion Share Repurchase Program, $2.65 Quarterly Dividend, Plans To Spend $45 Billion Over 3 Year

It’s Official: Apple Is Now Bigger Than The Entire US Retail Sector!

It’s Official – Apple Is Now Bigger Than The Entire US Retail Sector (ZeroHedge, Mar 14, 2012):

A company whose value is dependent on the continued success of two key products, now has a larger market capitalization (at $542 billion), than the entire US retail sector (as defined by the S&P 500). Little to add here.

Justice Department May Sue Apple, Publishers On E-Books For Colluding To Raise Prices

Justice Department May Sue Apple, Publishers On E-Books (Reuters, Mar 8, 2012):

The Justice Department has warned Apple and five major publishers that it plans to sue them, accusing them of colluding to raise the prices of electronic books, a person familiar with the probe said on Thursday.

Several parties have held talks to settle the potential antitrust case, said the person, who was not authorized to speak publicly on the matter.

The five publishers facing possible Justice Department action are Simon & Schuster Inc, a unit of CBS Corp; Lagardere SCA’s Hachette Book Group; Pearson Plc’s Penguin Group (USA); Macmillan, a unit of Verlagsgruppe Georg von Holtzbrinck GmbH; and HarperCollins Publishers Inc, a unit of News Corp.

U.S. and European officials have been investigating whether e-book publishers and Apple fixed prices in the growing electronic book industry, blocking rivals and hurting consumers.

Read moreJustice Department May Sue Apple, Publishers On E-Books For Colluding To Raise Prices

iPass Away – Do My Digital Downloads Die With Me?

iPass away – do my digital downloads die with me? (Which Conversation, Feb. 20, 2012):

If you’ve built up a proud collection of books, records and DVDs, you’d expect to be able to pass them on to your next of kin. But what happens to all of the downloads you’ve paid for during your life?

The digital afterlife is an uncertain business, it seems. We challenged both Apple and Amazon on whether digital downloads could be passed on after death, and neither could give us a definitive answer.

As more and more purchases are made in a digital, rather than physical form, we think it’s time for the main digital retailers to clear up our rights to pass on property we’ve paid for.

Purchasing a product, or renting a licence?

As it stands, the rights of iTunes and Amazon customers look pretty shaky when it comes to passing on downloads. If you buy a music track from a digital store, you’re essentially buying a licence to play that track – a licence granted to you only, which isn’t transferable upon death.

Legally you’re essentially just renting tracks – you don’t actually own them, as Matthew Strain of law firm Strain-Keville pointed out to us in the latest issue of Which? Computing:

‘We do not “own” what we purchase on iTunes, we only have the right to use it. The right to the “product” is therefore limited and passing it on to someone else is not likely to be accepted by Apple.’

Read moreiPass Away – Do My Digital Downloads Die With Me?

‘I felt a great disturbance in the Bourse, as if 216 hedge funds suddenly cried out in terror and were suddenly silenced. I fear something terrible has happened’

🙂

“A Great Disturbance In The Bourse” (ZeroHedge, Feb. 24, 2012):

“I felt a great disturbance in the Bourse, as if 216 hedge funds suddenly cried out in terror and were suddenly silenced. I fear something terrible has happened.”

What happened? Cook is speaking at the Apple shareholder meeting, and the topic of a dividend of the company’s $100 billion in cash has come up.

  • COOK IN ‘ACTIVE DISCUSSIONS’ ABOUT WHAT TO DO WITH APPLE CASH
  • COOK SAYS APPLE’S CASH IS ‘MORE THAN WE NEED TO RUN A COMPANY’

Of course, if there is a dividend, the magic is over. In the meantime, a drop in the stock is still inconceivable.

Next up: iBook?

  • APPLE CEO COOK SAYS FACEBOOK `FRIEND,’ NOT FOE
  • APPLE CEO SAYS APPLE, FACEBOOK `COULD DO MORE TOGETHER’

Or maybe facebook merely helps Apple create an app that helps it run Twitter?

title inspired by Chris Adams

Second iPhone Explodes In Less Than A Week

iPhone Explodes: Brazil Incident Is Apple’s Second In Less Than A Week (Huffington Post, Dec. 1, 2011):

For the second time in less than a week, an Apple iPhone 4 has reportedly exploded, this time in Brazil, according to Mashable.

The phone, which was plugged in for an overnight charge, suddenly began sparking and emitting smoke while it was just inches from its owner’s face.

The owner, Brazilian Ayla Paulo Mota told the Portuguese language blog TechTudo that he was not hurt during the incident, despite his close proximity to the phone.

Editors at The Huffington Post U.K. translated Mota’s comments into English:

“At dawn, I woke up seconds before witnessing the burning of my iPhone when I saw a lot of sparks and black smoke out of the cell. My room was full with an unbearable smell of smoke! At that moment, I turned off the power switch in the room to remove the phone from the outlet.”Last week, a similar incident occurred aboard a regional Australian airliner shortly before landing in Sydney. Officials from the airline company Regional Express described the incident as a “mobile phone self combustion” in which an iPhone began to glow red and emit a “significant amount of dense smoke.”

Read moreSecond iPhone Explodes In Less Than A Week

Apple iTunes FLAW Allowed Government Spying For 3 Years

Apple iTunes flaw ‘allowed government spying for 3 years’ (Telegraph, Nov. 24, 2011):

An unpatched security flaw in Apple’s iTunes software allowed intelligence agencies and police to hack into users’ computers for more than three years, it’s claimed.

A British company called Gamma International marketed hacking software to governments that exploited the vulnerability via a bogus update to iTunes, Apple’s media player, which is installed on more than 250 million machines worldwide.

The hacking software, FinFisher, is used to spy on intelligence targets’ computers. It is known to be used by British agencies and earlier this year records were discovered in abandoned offices of that showed it had been offered to Egypt’s feared secret police.

Apple was informed about the relevant flaw in iTunes in 2008, according to Brian Krebs, a security writer, but did not patch the software until earlier this month, a delay of more than three years.

“A prominent security researcher warned Apple about this dangerous vulnerability in mid-2008, yet the company waited more than 1,200 days to fix the flaw,” he said in a blog post.

Read moreApple iTunes FLAW Allowed Government Spying For 3 Years

Employees Of Silicon Valley Giants Like Google, Apple, Yahoo And Hewlett-Packard Send Their Children To A Waldorf School


While schools nationwide have rushed to supply their classrooms with computers, the Waldorf School of the Peninsula in Los Altos, Calif., has a no-screen policy. Yet it has become a popular choice for children of employees who work at Silicon Valley giants like Google, Apple and Yahoo.

Photo gallery

A Silicon Valley School That Doesn’t Compute (New York Times, Oct. 22, 2011):

LOS ALTOS, Calif. — The chief technology officer of eBay sends his children to a nine-classroom school here. So do employees of Silicon Valley giants like Google, Apple, Yahoo and Hewlett-Packard.

But the school’s chief teaching tools are anything but high-tech: pens and paper, knitting needles and, occasionally, mud. Not a computer to be found. No screens at all. They are not allowed in the classroom, and the school even frowns on their use at home.

Schools nationwide have rushed to supply their classrooms with computers, and many policy makers say it is foolish to do otherwise. But the contrarian point of view can be found at the epicenter of the tech economy, where some parents and educators have a message: computers and schools don’t mix.

This is the Waldorf School of the Peninsula, one of around 160 Waldorf schools in the country that subscribe to a teaching philosophy focused on physical activity and learning through creative, hands-on tasks. Those who endorse this approach say computers inhibit creative thinking, movement, human interaction and attention spans.

The Waldorf method is nearly a century old, but its foothold here among the digerati puts into sharp relief an intensifying debate about the role of computers in education.

“I fundamentally reject the notion you need technology aids in grammar school,” said Alan Eagle, 50, whose daughter, Andie, is one of the 196 children at the Waldorf elementary school; his son William, 13, is at the nearby middle school. “The idea that an app on an iPad can better teach my kids to read or do arithmetic, that’s ridiculous.”

Mr. Eagle knows a bit about technology. He holds a computer science degree from Dartmouth and works in executive communications at Google, where he has written speeches for the chairman, Eric E. Schmidt. He uses an iPad and a smartphone. But he says his daughter, a fifth grader, “doesn’t know how to use Google,” and his son is just learning. (Starting in eighth grade, the school endorses the limited use of gadgets.)

Read moreEmployees Of Silicon Valley Giants Like Google, Apple, Yahoo And Hewlett-Packard Send Their Children To A Waldorf School

Steve Jobs Dead At 56, His Life Ended Prematurely By Chemotherapy And Radiotherapy For Cancer

Steve Jobs dead at 56, his life ended prematurely by chemotherapy and radiotherapy for cancer (Natural News, Oct. 06, 2011):

It is extremely saddening to see the cost in human lives that modern society pays for its false belief in conventional medicine and the cancer industry in particular. Visionary Steve Jobs died today, just months after being treated for cancer with chemotherapy at the Stanford Cancer Center in Palo Alto, California. In recent months, he appeared in public photos as a frail shadow of his former self. The thin legs, sunken cheek bones and loss of body weight are all classic signs of total body toxicity observed in chemotherapy and radiotherapy patients.

Steve Jobs reportedly underwent both. His chemotherapy treatments at the Standard Cancer Center are now well known (http://www.marksmarketanalysis.com/…), and his secret radiotherapy treatments in Switzerland have now been made public by former Apple executive Jerry York.

Jerry York confided in Fortune Magazine about Steve Jobs’ secret flight to Switzerland to receive radiotherapy treatment for his cancer (http://tech.fortune.cnn.com/2011/01…). Fortune Magazine kept this secret until Jerry York died in March of 2010 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerry_…)), after which Fortune Magazine decided its confidentiality agreement with York no longer applied, and it published details about Jobs’ secret visits to Switzerland (http://gawker.com/5737092/steve-job…).

Fortune Magazine also repeats another fact about Steve Jobs that rarely appears in the press: Namely, that Steve Jobs underwent a secret liver transplant which raised eyebrows among many who wondered why a member of the wealthy business elite could receive a liver transplant essentially on demand while everybody else had to wait on a long transplant list (http://articles.cnn.com/2009-06-24/…).

In January of this year, Roc4Life.com reported:

“Jobs’ medical leave is due to cancer, but no one knows whether it stems from his 2004 battle with pancreatic cancer or complications from a secret liver transplant in 2009. According to recently deceased off-the-record source from Apple’s Jerry York, Jobs took an unpublicized flight to Switzerland in 2009 to undergo unusual treatment at the University of Basel. Switzerland’s University of Basel known for their radiotherapy treatments for neuroendocrine cancer and it’s unavailability in the U.S. Experts say Jobs’ pancreatic cancer has a history of reappearing and spreading to vital organs at a slow-growing pace, which probably explains the medical leave.”

In other words, there is no question that Steve Jobs underwent multiple conventional cancer treatments, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

Read moreSteve Jobs Dead At 56, His Life Ended Prematurely By Chemotherapy And Radiotherapy For Cancer

Bizarre: Lost iPhone 5 Prototype Update: Police Waiting In Car While Apple Investigators Search Man’s Home

Lost iPhone 5 Update: Police ‘Assisted’ Apple Investigators in Search of SF Man’s Home (San Francisco News, Sep. 2 2011):

The bizarre saga involving a lost prototype of the iPhone 5 has taken another interesting turn. Contradicting past statements that no records exist of police involvement in the search for the lost prototype, San Francisco Police Department spokesman Lt. Troy Dangerfield now tells SF Weekly that “three or four” SFPD officers accompanied two Apple security officials in an unusual search of a Bernal Heights man’s home.

Dangerfield says that, after conferring with Apple and the captain of the Ingleside police station, he has learned that plainclothes SFPD officers went with private Apple detectives to the home of Sergio Calderón, a 22-year-old resident of Bernal Heights. According to Dangerfield, the officers “did not go inside the house,” but stood outside while the Apple employees scoured Calderón’s home, car, and computer files for any trace of the lost iPhone 5. The phone was not found, and Calderón denies that he ever possessed it.

In an interview with SF Weekly last night, Calderón told us that six badge-wearing visitors came to his home in July to inquire about the phone. Calderón said none of them acknowledged being employed by Apple, and one of them offered him $300, and a promise that the owner of the phone would not press charges, if he would return the device.

The visitors also allegedly threatened him and his family, asking questions about their immigration status. “One of the officers is like, ‘Is everyone in this house an American citizen?’ They said we were all going to get into trouble,” Calderón said.

One of the officers left a phone number with him, which SF Weekly traced to Anthony Colon, an investigator employed at Apple, who declined to comment when we reached him.

Reached this afternoon, Calderón confirmed that only two of the six people who came to his home actually entered the house. He said those two did not specifically state they were police officers.

However, he said he was under the impression that they were all police, since they were part of the group outside that identified themselves as SFPD officials. The two who entered the house did not disclose that they were private security officers, according to Calderón.

“When they came to my house, they said they were SFPD,” Calderón said. “I thought they were SFPD. That’s why I let them in.” He said he would not have permitted the search if he had been aware the two people conducting it were not actually police officers.

Read moreBizarre: Lost iPhone 5 Prototype Update: Police Waiting In Car While Apple Investigators Search Man’s Home