Apollo 14 astronaut claims aliens HAVE made contact – but it has been covered up for 60 years


Edgar Mitchell was the Lunar Module Pilot for Apollo 14

Aliens have contacted humans several times but governments have hidden the truth for 60 years, the sixth man to walk on the moon has claimed.

Apollo 14 astronaut Dr Edgar Mitchell, said he was aware of many UFO visits to Earth during his career with NASA but each one was covered up.

Dr Mitchell, 77, said during a radio interview that sources at the space agency who had had contact with aliens described the beings as ‘little people who look strange to us.’

He said supposedly real-life ET’s were similar to the traditional image of a small frame, large eyes and head.

Chillingly, he claimed our technology is ‘not nearly as sophisticated’ as theirs and “had they been hostile”, he warned ‘we would be been gone by now’.

Read moreApollo 14 astronaut claims aliens HAVE made contact – but it has been covered up for 60 years

UFOs Spotted by Navy Engineer, Soldiers and Helicopter Police

Royal Navy aircraft engineer claims to have seen a “glowing” UFO hover over the M5 motorway.

Michael Madden, 25, said he watched in disbelief as the disc-shaped object floated above his head before it “zoomed off at incredible speed”.

He said the unidentified flying object flew for up to three minutes above junction 21 of the M5, near Weston-super-Mare, Somerset.

Mr Madden was on his way back from Manchester with colleague Michael Casson, 22, at 9.50pm on Sunday June 29 when he saw the suspected ‘extra-terrestrial’ craft.He said: “I work with aircraft and grew up next to Manchester Airport so I know exactly what a plane looks and sounds like. This was definitely not a plane.

“It was a circular disc which was glowing bright, hovering hundreds of metres up.

“Other people must have spotted it. It was unlike anything I’ve ever seen in my life. It really did look like the alien aircraft in films. It had an antenna fixed to the back.”

Mr Madden’s claim follows a string of recent UFO “sightings”.

On June 7 three soldiers said they saw 13 UFOs, which looked like “rotating cubes”, while on night patrol at Tern Hill military barracks near Market Drayton, Shropshire. One, Corporal Mark Proctor, 38, of the 1st Battalion of the Irish Regiment, recorded the sighting on his mobile phone and reported it to Army officers.

That sighting came just two hours before helicopter police officers reported an encounter with a huge craft 80 miles away near Cardiff. They claimed to have given chase to the “flying saucer-shaped” object after it almost collided with their aircraft near the Ministry of Defence base of St Athan.

Then Father-of-two David Osborne, 47, videoed 12 orange objects in the night sky above Basingstoke, Hampshire, at 10.40pm on June 28.

The alleged UFOs moved across the sky, switching from a D formation, to a random pattern, to a line then a triangle before disappearing.

02/07/2008

Source: Telegraph

Tom Parr lived 152 Years

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Medicine: A Challenge to Tom Parr

Source: Time Magazine

In 1944 the American Medical Association gave its distinguished service medal to wiry, twinkle-eyed Dr. George Dock, of Pasadena, Calif. Last week at the Los Angeles County Medical Association Building, 300 physicians closer to home honored the 90-year-old doctor by turning out to attend the tenth annual George Dock lecture.

The old scholar, who has given up the practice of internal medicine to spend his days improving the Los Angeles County Medical Association library, could not get to the lecture this year: he was confined to his home with a mild case of dysentery. But he got a great deal of satisfaction in knowing that the meeting was well attended and that his colleagues were showing a very lively interest in the history of medicine.*

In at the Birth. The lecture series was begun ten years ago to honor Dr. Dock as any good physician would like most to be honored-by encouraging interest in his pet subject, medical history. But Historian Dock had never neglected the other four main areas of his profession-practice, writing, research and teaching.

To the younger physicians and medical students in last week’s audience, Dr. Dock seemed almost a relic of the last century. He was in fact one of the eagerly assisting midwives at the birth of modern medicine.

He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania’s Medical School in 1884, before the X ray was discovered. He was a student, and later an associate, of the great Sir William Osier, who died 30 years ago. He was one of the first men to recognize leukemia and Hodgkin’s disease as tumors rather than infections. He published the first successful diagnosis on a living patient of the disease now called coronary thrombosis, and made microscopic post-mortem sections of coronary arteries a full 25 years before the process was generally understood.

Out in the Clinic. Since 1888, Dr. Dock has contributed 158 papers to medical journals on an astonishing variety of subjects, the titles of which give a clue to his wry humor and firm thoroughness, e.g., The Advantage of Using Potassium Iodide Until We Have Something Better, Spelling As An Index to the Preparation of the Preparation of the Medical Student. He was one of the first full-time professors of medicine in the U.S. (at Washington University in St. Louis). As a precise, energetic professor at the University of Michigan until 1908, he was the first teacher willing to make the clinic rounds white-jacketed like his students, helped give the school its reputation as one of the country’s finest medical colleges.

Last year, when he was able to attend the ninth George Dock lecture, Dr. Dock, then a mere 89, told his colleagues: “I would like to live as long as Tom Parr.”

Nobody was sure who Tom Parr was, but Los Angeles Urologist Elmer Belt went searching through his medical books in the systematic way that Dr. Dock would appreciate. Finally, buried deep in a volume of The Works of William Harvey (discoverer of the circulatory system), Dr. Belt found a four-page chapter titled: Anatomical Examination Of The Body Of Thomas Parr. It began: “Thomas Parr, a poor countryman, born near Winnington, in the County of Salop [England] died on the 14th of November in the Year of Grace 1635, after having lived 152 years and nine months and survived nine princes.”

Read moreTom Parr lived 152 Years

Most complex crop circle ever discovered in British fields

The most complex, “mind-boggling” crop circle ever to be seen in Britain has been discovered in a barley field in Wiltshire.


APEX PICTURES
The circle is a coded representation of pi to the 10th significant figure

The formation, measuring 150ft in diameter, is apparently a coded image representing the first 10 digits, 3.141592654, of pi.

It is has appeared in a field near Barbury Castle, an iron-age hill fort above Wroughton, Wilts, and has been described by astrophysicists as “mind-boggling”.

Michael Reed, an astrophysicist, said: “The tenth digit has even been correctly rounded up. The little dot near the centre is the decimal point.

“The code is based on 10 angular segments with the radial jumps being the indicator of each segment.

“Starting at the centre and counting the number of one-tenth segments in each section contained by the change in radius clearly shows the values of the first 10 digits in the value of pi.”

Lucy Pringle, a researcher of crop formations, said: “This is an astounding development – it is a seminal event.”

Mathematics codes and geometric patterns have long been an important factor in crop circle formations. One of the best known formations showed the image of a highly complex set of shapes known as The Julia Set, 12 years ago.

Read moreMost complex crop circle ever discovered in British fields

10-year-old scholar takes Calif. college by storm


10-year-old takes college by storm

Sophomore holds an A-plus average in subjects like algebra, astronomy

DOWNEY, Calif. – With the end of another school year approaching, college sophomore Moshe Kai Cavalin is cramming for final exams in classes such as advanced mathematics, foreign languages and music.

But Cavalin is only 10 years old. And at 4-foot-7, his shoes don’t quite touch the floor as he puts down a schoolbook and swivels around in his chair to greet a visitor.

“I’m studying statistics,” says the alternately precocious and shy Cavalin, his textbook lying open on the living room desk of his parents’ apartment in this quiet suburb east of Los Angeles.

Within a year, if he keeps up his grades and completes the rest of his requirements, he hopes to transfer from his two-year program at East Los Angeles College to a prestigious four-year school and study astrophysics.

‘Wormholes’ a primary interest
One of his primary interests is “wormholes,” a hypothetical scientific phenomenon connected to Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity. It has been theorized that if such holes do exist in space, they could — in tandem with black holes — allow for the kind of space-age time travel seen in science fiction.

“Just like black holes, they suck in particulate objects, and also like black holes, they also travel at escape velocity, which is, the speed to get out of there is faster than the speed of light,” Cavalin says. “I’d like to prove that wormholes are really there and prove all the theories are correct.”

First, he has statistics homework to finish. Later, he’ll work with his mother, Shu Chen Chien, to brush up on his Mandarin for his Chinese class. Then it’s over to the piano to prepare for his recital in music class.

His father, Yosef Cavalin, frets about the piano-playing, noting that his only child recently broke his arm pursuing another passion, martial arts. He has won several trophies for his age group.

Read more10-year-old scholar takes Calif. college by storm