The Army’s Totally Serious Mind-Control Project


Army scientists want to cram this array of brain-wave reading sensors into a helmet.

Soldiers barking orders at each other is so 20th Century. That’s why the U.S. Army has just awarded a $4 million contract to begin developing “thought helmets” that would harness silent brain waves for secure communication among troops. Ultimately, the Army hopes the project will “lead to direct mental control of military systems by thought alone.”

If this sounds insane, it would have been as recently as a few years ago. But improvements in computing power and a better understanding of how the brain works have scientists busy hunting for the distinctive neural fingerprints that flash through a brain when a person is talking to himself. The Army’s initial goal is to capture those brain waves with incredibly sophisticated software that then translates the waves into audible radio messages for other troops in the field. “It’d be radio without a microphone, ” says Dr. Elmar Schmeisser, the Army neuroscientist overseeing the program. “Because soldiers are already trained to talk in clean, clear and formulaic ways, it would be a very small step to have them think that way.”

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Aspartame Study: 67% of Female Rats Developed Visible Tumors

(PDF): Aspartame Study: 67% of Female Rats Developed Visible Tumors

During My Study, 2/3 of My Female Rats on Aspartame Developed Tumors

The following movies, show photos of the tumors on the females and males in the aspartame group.

Females on aspartame with tumors

The movie shows 20 females on aspartame with tumors, organized by color. Most appeared to be tumors of the lymph or mammary gland. That’s 20 out of 30 or 67% of the females on aspartame. Some also appeared to have tinges of yellowing fur, a possible symptom of aspartame poisoning.


Males on aspartame with tumors

The movie to the right shows seven males on aspartame with tumors. That’s 7/30 = 23% of all males on aspartame. Again, most appeared to be mammary or lymph gland tumors.

Some also appeared to have tinges of yellowing fur, a possible symptom of aspartame poisoning.

The percentage of females-to males from the aspartame group with tumors was 286%.

Female control group tumors

The movie shows five control group females with apparent mammary or lymph gland tumors. The tumors were significantly smaller than those of the females from the aspartame group. None of the males in the control group developed tumors.

Some also appeared to have tinges of yellowing fur, but the discoloration was less than those consuming aspartame.

Other Adverse Effects:

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L.A. County sees an upward trend in West Nile infections

The year is shaping up to be the worst in Southern California since 2004.

Jack Austin doesn’t remember a mosquito biting him. The 72-year-old Duarte resident also doesn’t remember the nine days he spent in the hospital in July or much of the 20 days he spent in rehab in August, recovering from West Nile neuroinvasive disease.

“One day I was fine, and the next day I fell and hit my head and was out of it,” he said. “The virus came on — boom — and it hit me fast.”

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Hackers claim there’s a black hole in the atom smashers’ computer network


From
September 13, 2008

Hackers have broken into one of the computer networks of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

A group calling itself the Greek Security Team left a rogue webpage describing the technicians responsible for computer security at the giant atom smasher as “schoolkids” – but reassuring scientists that they did not want to disrupt the experiment.

The hackers gained access to a website open to other scientists on Wednesday as the LHC passed its first test, sending its protons off on their dizzying journey through time and space, close to the speed of light.

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Cord blood bank ‘will save lives’

Eva was saved by a donation of cord blood like that donated by baby Darcey

A scheme to store blood taken from the umbilical cords of newborns and use it to save lives has been launched.

Cord blood, like bone marrow, can help patients survive deadly diseases such as leukaemia.

For now, the Anthony Nolan Trust Cord Blood Bank can take cord blood at just one hospital, with plans for more UK collection centres.

Even so, the charity predicted the 50,000 expected donations over the next five years would prevent many deaths.

Cord blood provides a way to give a patient the ability to produce new blood cells after this has been lost through illness or aggressive treatment.

As well as patients with blood cancers, those with sickle cell disease and immune problems could benefit.

The thing about cord blood is that it’s just thrown away – but it could save someone’s life
Mark Behan
parent of cord blood patient

It contains potent “stem cells“, which, if placed back into the bone marrow, can start producing the right sort of cells.

The umbilical cord is normally thrown away after birth, so, unlike bone marrow donation, there is no discomfort or risk to the donor.

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Sept. 11, 1822: Church Admits It’s Not All About Us


Galileo Galilei, Italian mathematician, astronomer and physicist, was condemned for heresy by the the Roman Inquisition in 1633. He spent the last eight years of his life under house arrest.
Painting: Joseph Nicolas Robert-Fleury (1797-1890)/Bettmann Corbis

1822: The College of Cardinals finally caves in to the hard facts of science, saying that the “publication of works treating of the motion of the Earth and the stability of the sun, in accordance with the opinion of modern astronomers, is permitted.”

It represented a major shift in dogma for the Catholic Church, a concession that the Earth, in fact, might revolve around the sun. Unfortunately, it came 189 years too late to do Galileo Galilei any good.

Still, it would take another 13 years, until 1835, before Galileo’s Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems — the work in which he defends the heliocentric theory — would be removed from the Vatican’s list of banned books.

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Scientists launch huge particle-smasher experiment

GENEVA (Reuters) – International scientists celebrated the successful start of a huge particle-smashing machine on Wednesday which aims to simulate the conditions of the “Big Bang” that created the universe.

Experiments using the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the biggest and most complex machine ever made, could revamp modern physics and unlock secrets about the universe and its origins.

The project has had to work hard to deny suggestions by some critics that the experiment could create tiny black holes of intense gravity that could suck in the whole planet.

Such fears spurred huge public interest in advanced physics ahead of the start up of the 10 billion Swiss franc ($9 billion) machine, which proceeded smoothly on Wednesday morning.

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Pigs to be bred for transplants

LORD Winston, the fertility expert and Labour peer, is to begin breeding genetically modified pigs in the hope of providing organs for transplant to humans, it was reported yesterday.

Scientists in London and California have begun experiments to find a solution to record waits for organ transplants. In Britain around 8,000 patients are on waiting lists.

“People needing a new heart or liver are waiting for someone else to die – usually a violent death in a traffic accident,” Lord Winston wrote in a Sunday newspaper.

Lord Winston, who heads the Institute of Reproductive and Developmental Biology at London’s Hammersmith Hospital, expects the technique to provide a solution to the shortage of organs within ten years.

The scientists are introducing human genes into the animals to reduce the chances of the organs being rejected by patients’ bodies.

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Shoppers to use fingerprints or eye scans to pay for goods


Barclaycard has announced it is investing a seven-figure sum in “contactless payment” technology Photo: Getty Images

The futuristic systems, like those used by Tom Cruise in the science fiction film Minority Report, are being developed by scientists for Barclaycard.

The company has announced it is investing a seven-figure sum in “contactless payment” technology.

This allows customers to use everyday items they carry around with them – such as mobile phones, key fobs or even their eyes or fingerprints – to make payments.

It means shoppers will no longer have to rely on cards.

Barclaycard, which is part of Barclays, has already introduced a new-style cash machine in the United Arab Emirates enabling people to use their fingerprints to withdraw money and shoppers in the UK may soon be able to use the same technology.

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Air-purifying Church Windows Were Early Nanotechnology

ScienceDaily (Aug. 25, 2008) – Stained glass windows that are painted with gold purify the air when they are lit up by sunlight, a team of Queensland University of Technology experts have discovered.

Associate Professor Zhu Huai Yong, from QUT’s School of Physical and Chemical Sciences said that glaziers in medieval forges were the first nanotechnologists who produced colours with gold nanoparticles of different sizes.

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